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=> GENERAL DISCUSSION => Topic started by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 09:31:00 am

Title: Books
Post by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 09:31:00 am
a'ight loons
 
 I am about to embark on a three week trip w/ multiple flights....
 
 anyone read any good books lately?
 
 bonus points for paperbacks - trying to travel light
Title: Re: Books
Post by: on June 22, 2005, 09:58:00 am
<img src="http://www.obrien.ie/covers/Stakeknife.jpg" alt=" - " />
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sage 703 on June 22, 2005, 10:20:00 am
I'm reading Michael Chabon's "The Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," and thus far its great.  Won the Pulitzer - very easy to read and entertaining.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: kosmo vinyl on June 22, 2005, 10:26:00 am
via kosmette
 
 Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides (Virgin Suicides)
 anything by Bill Bryson
 Sarah Vowell's stuff
 David Sedaris' stuff
 Lamb: the Gospel according to Biff;
 Everything by A. S. Byatt is always at the top of her list, but it might be a chick thing...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bartelby on June 22, 2005, 10:45:00 am
I second "Middlesex" - and it ain't discussing a city in the UK either...it'll keep you thinking and engrossed (or just grossed out) for a LONG time.  ;)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: HomesickAlien on June 22, 2005, 10:48:00 am
Scott Heim - Mysterious Skin
 Donna Tartt - The Secret History
 
 The last one makes you addicted, so I'm warning you. ;-)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: on June 22, 2005, 10:49:00 am
<img src="http://www.thesavvytraveller.com/agraphics/insights/geography/1general/humor/molvania.jpg" alt=" - " />
Title: Re: Books
Post by: xcanuck on June 22, 2005, 10:56:00 am
Quote
Originally posted by kosmo vinyl:
  via kosmette
 
 Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides (Virgin Suicides)
 anything by Bill Bryson
 Sarah Vowell's stuff
 David Sedaris' stuff
 Lamb: the Gospel according to Biff;
 Everything by A. S. Byatt is always at the top of her list, but it might be a chick thing...
Kosmette has good taste. Middlesex was definitely one of my favorite books in 2003. I love Sedaris' books - always a good laugh but it seems to be so much better when he reads (eg. audiobooks). Alot of the jokes come across better that way. The absolute best is when he imitates his redneck hip-hop brother. Or when he sings TV commercial jingles in the style of Billie Holiday.  :)
 
 If you like dark humour, then I would heartily recommend Chuck Palahniuk. The man is a genius. Choke is my favorite.
 
 I'm a big fan of Richard Russo (he won the Pulitzer for Empire Falls and deservedly so). Empire Falls and Straight Man are my favorites. Russo writes about small towns in the NorthEast. What attracts me is that his protagonists are usually the kind of people we would see hanging out in the local watering hole - decent people with fatal flaws. There aren't happy endings in the stereotypical sense. Issues resolve themselves in the way that real life tends to, for better or worse.
 
 If you like mysteries and want something more substantial than the usual brain candy (ie James Patterson or Johnathan Kellerman), try The Alienist (Caleb Carr) or The Dante Club (Matthew Perl). The Alienist is almost like Silence of the Lambs but set in turn of the century Manhattan, a time when the concept of forensic psychology was barely in it's infancy. The Dante Club is a murder mystery for literature buffs. Murders are committed and the common link is that the manner of death is copied from Dante's Inferno. Literary giants of the day are enlisted to help solve the crime. Both books use historical fiction to the max.
 
 That's my two cents worth. Your mileage may vary.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sage 703 on June 22, 2005, 11:03:00 am
Middlesex is phenomenal.  I personally don't care for Palahniuk; I think he uses the same narrative voice in all of his books - basically, everybody narrator is analagous to Jack in Fight Club (Ed Norton's character).  Nihilistic and cynical.  And Palahniuk seems to have a need to be shocking for the sake of being shocking, without having any real purpose - he loves extremely violent images that border on sadistic without really making a point for using them.
 
 Nick Hornby has a new book out that has gotten some mixed reviews; that could be worth looking into.
 
 Also, if you haven't read the English Patient, its unbelievable - I never saw the film, but the book is great.  Michael Ondaantje (I think this is how you spell it).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 11:04:00 am
already read it - yes, its very good
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by callat703:
  I'm reading Michael Chabon's "The Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," and thus far its great.  Won the Pulitzer - very easy to read and entertaining.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sage 703 on June 22, 2005, 11:04:00 am
Richard Russo was boring to me; I couldn't get through Empire Falls.  I thought he was kind of trite; he tried to be witty and didn't pull it off.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 11:05:00 am
I really liked the Secret History....in fact I think it was my contribution to a Secret Santa forum gathering a few years ago
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by HomesickAlien:
  Scott Heim - Mysterious Skin
 Donna Tartt - The Secret History
 
 The last one makes you addicted, so I'm warning you. ;-)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on June 22, 2005, 11:05:00 am
Just finished this -- should be right up your alley, brennser:
 
  <img src="http://www.ffbooks.co.uk/images/n25/n128923.jpg" alt=" - " />
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 11:07:00 am
Middlesex seems to be emerging as the early favorite, although the Dupek book on undercover Brits might be good as I will be roaming the border between N. and Rep Ireland
Title: Re: Books
Post by: HoyaSaxa03 on June 22, 2005, 11:15:00 am
<img src="http://www.goodreports.net/elem.gif" alt=" - " />
 
 one of the best modern novels i've read ... it's a great book full of big ideas and disturbing imagery
Title: Re: Books
Post by: kosmo vinyl on June 22, 2005, 11:17:00 am
kosmette would also like to point out she is reading lots of young adult books these days. and says the Bartimaeus trilogy is great fun if your into that type of thing...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: palahniukkubrick on June 22, 2005, 12:03:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by callat703:
    And Palahniuk seems to have a need to be shocking for the sake of being shocking, without having any real purpose - he loves extremely violent images that border on sadistic without really making a point for using them.
 
 
While not being true for all of his works, his new book  Haunted  certainly fits this description. He seems to have taken astray with his intentions to shock. But I still like him. To brennser I recommend Chuck's novel 'Survivor' about the last living member of a cult who is dictating his life story to a black box in a plane he hijacked. It is Chuck's best novel, with some truly hilarious moments and characters.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sage 703 on June 22, 2005, 12:05:00 pm
It might be that I need to give him another chance; I read Lullaby and was really turned off by it.  But perhaps I've spoken too soon, or just read the wrong book.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: palahniukkubrick on June 22, 2005, 12:07:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by callat703:
  It might be that I need to give him another chance; I read Lullaby and was really turned off by it.  But perhaps I've spoken too soon, or just read the wrong book.
I didn't much care for Lullaby either. Chuck shouldn't try to do horror. But check out 'Choke','Survivor', and 'Invisible Monsters'. They're all excellent reads.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Frank Gallagher on June 22, 2005, 12:19:00 pm
<img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1740595971.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg" alt=" - " />
 
 My wife said it's pretty good, I haven't had a chance to start it just yet.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: xcanuck on June 22, 2005, 01:31:00 pm
For those with a soft spot for the Irish, I would definitely recommend Round Ireland With a Fridge, by Tony Hawks.
 
 It's an extremely funny travelogue. Basically, Tony Hawks makes a drunken bet in a pub one night that he can hitchhike all the way around Ireland in one month....with a refridgerator in tow. He actually pulls it off and the book describes his adventure. It gives people on this side of the pond a great feel for the genuine hospitality and humour of the Irish.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on June 22, 2005, 01:39:00 pm
yup, read it - funny stuff - much better than 'McCarthys bar' which some people say is similar but which I found boring
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by xcanuck:
  For those with a soft spot for the Irish, I would definitely recommend Round Ireland With a Fridge, by Tony Hawks.
 
 It's an extremely funny travelogue. Basically, Tony Hawks makes a drunken bet in a pub one night that he can hitchhike all the way around Ireland in one month....with a refridgerator in tow. He actually pulls it off and the book describes his adventure. It gives people on this side of the pond a great feel for the genuine hospitality and humour of the Irish.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: beetsnotbeats on June 22, 2005, 01:40:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by callat703:
  I'm reading Michael Chabon's "The Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," and thus far its great.  Won the Pulitzer - very easy to read and entertaining.
But keep a dictionary handy; Chabon has a thing for obscure words. His mind probably works such that they come naturally for him but I often had to put down the deckled tome to look up words such as "deckled" (as used in "Wonder Boys," which is wonderful, by the way).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: kcjones119 on June 22, 2005, 01:53:00 pm
Recently I've enjoyed:
 "Fortress of Solitude" - Jonathan Letham
 "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" - Jonathan Safran Foer (His first novel, "everything is illuminated" is great too)
 
 I'd also throw in another vote for Middlesex and any Sedaris stuff.  If you haven't read it, Chuck Klosterman's "Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs" is excellent.  For anthologies of shorter articles any of DaCapo's Best Music Writing books or the Dave Eggers edited "Best American Non-Required Reading" books are damn good.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Fico on June 22, 2005, 02:00:00 pm
Julia Alvarez "Time of the Butterflies"
 
 Mario Vargas Llosa "Feast of the Goat"
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sir HC on June 22, 2005, 03:06:00 pm
"Freakanomics"  quick read but a lot of cool points about different cause/effect relations in the real world.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Frank Gallagher on June 22, 2005, 03:13:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by brennser:
  yup, read it - funny stuff - much better than 'McCarthys bar' which some people say is similar but which I found boring
 
   
Quote
Originally posted by xcanuck:
  For those with a soft spot for the Irish, I would definitely recommend Round Ireland With a Fridge, by Tony Hawks.
 
 It's an extremely funny travelogue. Basically, Tony Hawks makes a drunken bet in a pub one night that he can hitchhike all the way around Ireland in one month....with a refridgerator in tow. He actually pulls it off and the book describes his adventure. It gives people on this side of the pond a great feel for the genuine hospitality and humour of the Irish.
[/b]
I enjoyed that one also.....the fact that nobody thought it weird that someone would be hitchiking round Ireland with a fridge in tow is typical of the all accepting Irish. (Well, apart from the refugees, but that's for another topic)
 
 Just asked her indoors, she says round Ireland is better than Jaywalking, but jaywalking is still worth a read.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on July 17, 2005, 11:20:00 am
ended up with this
 
 absolutely brilliant - a must for music fans or anyone who's been in a band
 
   <img src="http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/0718146328.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg" alt=" - " />
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on July 17, 2005, 01:09:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by brennser:
  ended up with this
 
 
I too enjoyed that.
 
 If you really want to understand the world today (quickly becoming my bible):
 
    <img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1593977514.01._AA240_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg" alt=" - " />
 
 It's not overly technical, but an insightful look at how technology and most importantly global fiber-optic networks are quickly changing the world's economic landscape.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Chip Chanko on July 17, 2005, 03:20:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by vansmack:
 If you really want to understand the world today (quickly becoming my bible):
 
     <img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1593977514.01._AA240_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg" alt=" - " />
 
 It's not overly technical, but an insightful look at how technology and most importantly global fiber-optic networks are quickly changing the world's economic landscape. [/QB]
This is on my short list right now...his columns are great...the kind of stuff that gets me really energized on a morning flight (if i had coffee before getting on the plane).
 
 I just finished Pattern Recognition by William F. Gibson. It was a quick fun read (as his stuff usually is).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hammerexile on July 17, 2005, 04:58:00 pm
For what it's worth, I'd definitely agree with the host of recommendations for 'Middlesex'. Really enjoyed it when i read it a couple of years ago. Kudos also to whoever suggested 'The Dante Club'.
 If you like your fiction to have a historical context, I would recommend Edward Rutherford's 'London: The Novel'. Basically it's a huge novel following a number of families down the ages from Roman times to present day against the back drop of the growth of London. He's also recently done the same sort of thing with Dublin in 'Princes of Ireland'.
 At the moment I'm reading 'Crytonomicon' by Neal Stephenson, which I'm really enjoying. Story flips between the activities of the code-breakers at Bletchley Park in WWII and the efforts of one of their decendents to set-up a data haven in South East Asia.
 
 Whatever you end up taking with you, have a safe journey and a great time.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hammerexile on July 17, 2005, 05:09:00 pm
Sorry, but I totally forgot about my favourite author, Christopher Brookmyre! If you like your humour pitch black and very British, he's well worth looking out for. He's got a great website (www.brookmyre.co.uk) where he's posted several short stories. He's been likened to a Scottish Carl Hiassen and for my money he's one of the funniest men writing at the moment.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: boweswana on July 18, 2005, 09:48:00 am
I just got back from the beach and loaded up on semi-brainless easy to understand when more than semi-intoxicated and sunstroked literature.
 
 London Bridge by James Patterson - Yet another chapter in the Alex Cross series.  400 pages leads up to a dumb ending that makes the whole thing seem pointless. C-  
 
 Hard Revolution by George Pelecanos - Set in D.C. around the time of the '68 riots about a black rookie cop and his drug addict brother.  Good read and a good insight into what prompted the riots if you don't know much about it. A-
 
 Soul Circus by George Pelecanos - Flash forward the rookie cop from Hard Revolution to modern day.  Good story about gangs, drugs and firearms in D.C.  References lots of bars and restraunts about town as well as gun shops in Virginia. B          
 
 The Hundredth Man by Jack Kerley - Maverick detective tracks down serial killer with wisecracking black partner in tow.  Terrible. F
 
 A Question of Blood by Ian Rankin - Embittered detective Jon Rebus smokes cigarettes and drinks beers while solving a multiple murder at a toney prep school in Scotland.  I like the whole Rebus series and this was a good one.  B
 
 Skinny Dip by Carl Hiassen - Guy throws wife off a cruise ship to get rid of her, she survives and hooks up with crusty ex-cop to torment him and save the Everglades.  Very entertaining.  B
 
 Flashman by George Fraser - First in the incredibly awesome series of historical fiction books about a highly decorated and totally cowardly 19th century british soldier who whores and drinks his way inadvertently into every significant world event from 1845 - 1890.  Probably the 10th read for me.  A+
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Venerable Bede on July 18, 2005, 10:22:00 am
am reading this right now:
 
   <img src="http://a1204.g.akamai.net/7/1204/1401/04082615011/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/8170000/8176085.jpg" alt=" - " />
 
 would have been reading this if stupid UPS had bothered to try to actually deliver this to me on saturday:
 
   <img src="http://a1204.g.akamai.net/7/1204/1401/05030808011/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/9190000/9196145.jpg" alt=" - " />
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on July 18, 2005, 11:40:00 am
Quote
Originally posted by Venerable Bede:
 
 would have been reading this if stupid UPS had bothered to try to actually deliver this to me on saturday:
 
 
Samckette's arrived at 8 AM this morning, but she had already left for work.  Maybe I should hide it from her and say it hasn't arrived yet.....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hammerexile on July 18, 2005, 11:55:00 am
Got my copy of HP6 from Safeway on Sat with my bacon and eggs. Finished it that night.
 
 It's an alright read, but I get the distinct impression it's just setting everything up for the final book.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Venerable Bede on July 18, 2005, 12:06:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by vansmack:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Venerable Bede:
 
 would have been reading this if stupid UPS had bothered to try to actually deliver this to me on saturday:
 
 
Samckette's arrived at 8 AM this morning, but she had already left for work.  Maybe I should hide it from her and say it hasn't arrived yet..... [/b]
perhaps you should direct her  here (http://harrypotter.warnerbros.com/gobletoffire/index.html), that might buy you some time.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on July 18, 2005, 12:14:00 pm
Quote
Originally posted by Venerable Bede:
  perhaps you should direct her  here (http://harrypotter.warnerbros.com/gobletoffire/index.html), that might buy you some time.
I'm going to edit that, and when they show Hermione growing up, I'm going to splice the Old Lindsay Lohan on SNL.  Then, and only then, will I go see the movie.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: kurosawa-b/w on July 18, 2005, 12:26:00 pm
My Harry Potter didn't arrive on time, either. *annoyed*
 
 As for reading, lately I've been hooked on Arturo Perez-Reverte.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 31, 2014, 02:39:47 pm
anybody have any thoughts on George Washington biographies? what is a good one? I'm not talking about a "rah rah rah he was the greatest man ever" type bio either..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on January 31, 2014, 03:17:54 pm
anybody have any thoughts on George Washington biographies? what is a good one? I'm not talking about a "rah rah rah he was the greatest man ever" type bio either..

This one (http://www.amazon.com/Being-George-Washington-Indispensable-Youve/dp/145165927X/ref=la_B001IQUMVM_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1391194444&sr=1-6) looks good for you.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 31, 2014, 09:47:07 pm
anybody have any thoughts on George Washington biographies? what is a good one? I'm not talking about a "rah rah rah he was the greatest man ever" type bio either..

This one (http://www.amazon.com/Being-George-Washington-Indispensable-Youve/dp/145165927X/ref=la_B001IQUMVM_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1391194444&sr=1-6) looks good for you.

umm no glen beck

and i am pretty sure that will be a ra ra one

i'm reading chernow's gw bio right now..its good but not a knockout like hamilton one (that is a must). i read ellis' last year...that is a good one... and short

i can't believe douglas freeman's 7 volume one is out of print... i have managed to acquire vol 3 of that one but not sure about tackling it
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Stillwater on February 02, 2014, 03:14:23 pm
I just read Questlove's book and there is a story about Prince roller skating with Eddie Murphy, a hotel party with Tracy Morgan and a shout out the club in it.  It was entertaining-quick read.

Apparently, The Roots manager considers the best show the Roots ever played to be at the 9:30 Club and Questlove missed it for his sister's wedding.  Anyone remember seeing the Roots in the late 90s/early 2000s  at the club without him?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: i am gay and i like cats on February 02, 2014, 03:25:03 pm
re reading the entire dark tower series.  so good.  got to the wolves of the calla years ago, and tried reading it recently but had totally forgotten the story of the books before it, so i decided to reread the entire series up to that point.  also reading the classic piece of literature, known as infinite jest.  good god.  brilliant.  love that book.  too bad the best artists kill themselves.  i think satan makes them do it, just because, he can.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: i am gay and i like cats on February 25, 2014, 12:13:42 pm
the terror, by dan simmons.  great read abounding with wonderful descriptive characterizations of the inner turmoil of not knowing what is out amongst the unexplored . . . and everything you never thought you wanted to know about sailing through the artic ice in the late eighteen hundreds.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 14, 2014, 11:42:23 pm
I been reading a ton lately.... my current book which I will finish tonight unless I do what I should and go to bed is Buddy Guy's autobiography When I Left Home..

I'm really enjoying it...Buddy's stories about Mud, Wolf, John Lee Hooker, Junior Wells, Little Walter, Chess, the Stones etc... are just wonderful.....its a real easy read.. I think the book could have been a lot longer...also could have used a proofread before publishing but I'm loving it... also , now I understand Buddy Guy's live show a bit more.... I never realized he had sort of pioneered that bit about playing his guitar while walking around the club way back in the 1950s....yes he did get it from Lightnin' Slim but still...

making me hungry to see him when he rolls by the State Theatre again..even thoughthe show will be the same as always....a bit too much talking, too many stories etc... but boy I love his sound when he jams

while reading it i been listening to a cd of some sides he cut in the 60s for Chess.... stuff that went ignored at the time but its pretty killer....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on May 01, 2014, 10:42:42 am
Let it come down by Paul Bowles


I found it pretty amazing...certainly a better book for me than the sheltering sky


he's about the only beat writer I can stomach.... is he a beat writer? does it matter?

I want to read hiis other two novels.. I know i have one with all his short stories somewhere around here..

it did make me want to smoke some kif bad...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: i am gay and i like cats on May 01, 2014, 11:34:54 am
has anybody read the original dune?  it is my next adventure . . . but people tell me it is so darn difficult to truly comprehend at complete enjoyment, as if the intelligence requirements outweigh the acceptance you are fully understanding what you are reading.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Hexenjagd on May 01, 2014, 01:03:00 pm
The Dune series is great.  I love the core series, and also the expanded universe stuff his son helped write based off of his notes. 

And no, it is not difficult to comprehend.  What it is, is one of the greatest Sci-Fi sagas, that takes the reader across space over a span of thousands of years.  It is a series about religion (especially as using religion as propaganda/population control), science, Giant sandworms, Messiah...

It is easy to get into if you love sci fi.

It is also one of the only series I will DEFINITELY reread over the next few years.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: atomic on May 01, 2014, 03:33:10 pm
The Dune series is great.  I love the core series, and also the expanded universe stuff his son helped write based off of his notes. 

And no, it is not difficult to comprehend.  What it is, is one of the greatest Sci-Fi sagas, that takes the reader across space over a span of thousands of years.  It is a series about religion (especially as using religion as propaganda/population control), science, Giant sandworms, Messiah...

It is easy to get into if you love sci fi.

It is also one of the only series I will DEFINITELY reread over the next few years.

Doesn't this belong in the geek thread?  I mean I come here to discuss books and it is like "No!!!".
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on May 01, 2014, 03:36:33 pm
The Dune series is great.  I love the core series, and also the expanded universe stuff his son helped write based off of his notes. 

And no, it is not difficult to comprehend.  What it is, is one of the greatest Sci-Fi sagas, that takes the reader across space over a span of thousands of years.  It is a series about religion (especially as using religion as propaganda/population control), science, Giant sandworms, Messiah...

It is easy to get into if you love sci fi.

It is also one of the only series I will DEFINITELY reread over the next few years.

Doesn't this belong in the geek thread?  I mean I come here to discuss books and it is like "No!!!".
To be fair, it IS a book and not a graphic novel, and they have been pretty good about keeping their nerdcrap in the nerdcrap thread. Fair play as posted.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: James Ford on May 01, 2014, 03:36:40 pm
I'm reading this book.

The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World

http://www.amazon.com/The-Geography-Bliss-Grumps-Happiest/dp/044669889X


It's a fun read, so far.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on May 01, 2014, 04:02:04 pm
I'm reading Five Days at Memorial.  It's a really tough read, but a book worth reading.  Crazy what happened.

My favorite book of last year was The Goldfinch.  Loved it.  One of the best books I've read in a while.

I also enjoyed Where'd You Go, Bernadette?  Just as a light fun read!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on May 01, 2014, 04:13:15 pm
My favorite book of last year was The Goldfinch.  Loved it.  One of the best books I've read in a while.
I just finished this two days ago. Hadn't heard of it until it won the Pulitzer. Really good.

Enon by Paul Harding was my fav 2013 work of fiction, but they'll never award consecutive Pulitzers to a fiction author. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Hexenjagd on May 01, 2014, 06:58:48 pm
Doesn't this belong in the geek thread?  I mean I come here to discuss books and it is like "No!!!".
Well, it is a book series.  If we were talking about the movie, mini-series, or video games; those would have been more appropriate for the nerd thread. 

Have you never read Dune atomic?  You are missing out.

(my favorite of the book covers)
(http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m589qrFffi1qbaom0.jpg)

Dune, like a lot of literature, has aged well.  I would much rather read an old book, than watch an old movie.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: James Ford on May 01, 2014, 08:46:23 pm
I'm not familiar with Dune but is it more evidence that you're really 12?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Hexenjagd on May 01, 2014, 09:43:21 pm
It is not a children's book series. You admit you know nothing about it, so why make the assumption that it is for children and that I must be a child?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on May 01, 2014, 10:06:34 pm
Finishing this:

(http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/arts/books/2012/02/bookcovers-3d/120228_BOOKS_godsWithoutMen.jpg.CROP.original-original.jpg)

Starting this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ASis1P3hL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on May 01, 2014, 10:27:04 pm

Starting this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ASis1P3hL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
There was a Talk Of The Town piece in this weeks New Yorker about him. It's on my non-fiction pile; let me know how it is when you finish.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on May 01, 2014, 11:45:03 pm
yeah also covered on NPR..its the IT book right now....apparently it all came together based on one of Balzac's novels..

I can live with that..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Seth Hurwitz on May 02, 2014, 01:25:59 am
reading Moby Dick for the first time

surprising thing is how many people tell me they have read it multiple times
Title: Re: Books
Post by: chaz on May 02, 2014, 10:13:48 am
My favorite book of last year was The Goldfinch.  Loved it.  One of the best books I've read in a while.
I just finished this two days ago. Hadn't heard of it until it won the Pulitzer. Really good.

Enon by Paul Harding was my fav 2013 work of fiction, but they'll never award consecutive Pulitzers to a fiction author. 
Thanks for this, got a vacation coming up in a week and am stockpiling reading material.  Just ordered this.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on May 02, 2014, 10:23:36 am
reading Moby Dick for the first time

surprising thing is how many people tell me they have read it multiple times
fifty pages of great story and three hundred pages of whaling technique minutiae. I have no idea why anyone would read it multiple times.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on May 02, 2014, 10:32:37 am
There are certain classics I will read every other year or so, such as Great Gatsby, Sun Also Rises and Motley Crue's The Dirt.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on May 02, 2014, 11:28:24 am
, Sun Also Rises

yes


although i find hemingways portrayal of cohn a bit disturbing (is it anti-jewish? i am still not sure)

i mean to find the account by the guy hemingway based cohn on..its out there but its rare and expensive to get
Title: Re: Books
Post by: atomic on May 02, 2014, 03:44:50 pm
reading Moby Dick for the first time

surprising thing is how many people tell me they have read it multiple times

I got 200 pages in and gave up. Overrated.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: atomic on May 02, 2014, 03:47:31 pm
There are certain classics I will read every other year or so, such as Great Gatsby, Sun Also Rises and Motley Crue's The Dirt.

Tried reading Sun Also Rises numerous times.  Never have gotten more than have way through.  Boring people not doing anything.  Great Gatsby is good but not my favorite Fitzgerald book.

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on May 02, 2014, 03:53:30 pm
Great Gatsby is good but not my favorite Fitzgerald book.
The Beautiful  & Damned?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on May 02, 2014, 03:54:14 pm
One of the reasons I like Sun Also Rises is because it doesn't have the big drama of Farewell to Arms or Whom the Bell Tolls but just kinda describes day-to-day life in a historic era, Paris in the 20s. I feel similarly about Gatsby, in that it's a vivid snapshot into how certain people lived and talked and acted back then.

I also love the spare writing style of Sun. To me, it evokes a lot with very few words.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on May 02, 2014, 07:05:24 pm
Farewell to Arms was a bit of a chore to get through for me...

For whom the bell tolls forget about it.... I doubt I will ever make it to the end

The Sun Also Rises is my favorite by him by a stretch though its probably his short stories where he shines the most...

Title: Re: Books
Post by: atomic on May 02, 2014, 07:36:27 pm
Great Gatsby is good but not my favorite Fitzgerald book.
The Beautiful  & Damned?

This side of Paradise.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 03, 2014, 04:11:58 pm

Starting this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ASis1P3hL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
I just finished that along with Zealot. Both great.

Anyone have any current fiction recommendations?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: atomic on June 03, 2014, 04:13:34 pm

Starting this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ASis1P3hL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
I just finished that along with Zealot. Both great.

Anyone have any current fiction recommendations?

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on June 04, 2014, 12:13:56 pm

Starting this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41ASis1P3hL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
I just finished that along with Zealot. Both great.

Anyone have any current fiction recommendations?

Reading Boy, Snow, Bird and liking it so far.  I also enjoyed Beautiful Ruins, but really cannot recommend The Goldfinch enough.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 04, 2014, 12:19:13 pm
Goldfinch was great. Totally deserving of that Pulitzer. I was a little thrown by the anachronisms throughout, the time frame of the entire book doesn't really make sense.

I was talking to someone about it last week and they made some offhand comment that whoever the illustrator was that did the picture of the bird on the opening page did a poor job and it was hard to believe such a crappy picture would be priceless. I then, with my snarkiest grin, informed them the titular painting exists in real life (albeit is at The Hague, not MOMA) and that's a photocopy. They were speechless.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on June 04, 2014, 12:33:05 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 04, 2014, 12:39:40 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Hey, thanks!

Has anyone read the Chabon book (Telegraph Avenue?) that came out last year? Any good?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on June 04, 2014, 12:50:29 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Hey, thanks!

Has anyone read the Chabon book (Telegraph Avenue?) that came out last year? Any good?

Meh.  It's Chabon, but definitely a weaker Chabon.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 04, 2014, 12:52:57 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Hey, thanks!

Has anyone read the Chabon book (Telegraph Avenue?) that came out last year? Any good?

Meh.  It's Chabon, but definitely a weaker Chabon.
Yiddish Policeman level bad? That was the one I discarded halfway thru.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on June 04, 2014, 01:04:10 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Hey, thanks!

Has anyone read the Chabon book (Telegraph Avenue?) that came out last year? Any good?

Meh.  It's Chabon, but definitely a weaker Chabon.
Yiddish Policeman level bad? That was the one I discarded halfway thru.

Yiddish Policemen's Union is far superior to Telegraph Avenue.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 04, 2014, 01:10:13 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.
Hey, thanks!

Has anyone read the Chabon book (Telegraph Avenue?) that came out last year? Any good?

Meh.  It's Chabon, but definitely a weaker Chabon.
Yiddish Policeman level bad? That was the one I discarded halfway thru.

Yiddish Policemen's Union is far superior to Telegraph Avenue.
Oh, Lord, scratch that one then!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on June 04, 2014, 03:54:22 pm
I'm a vinyl maniac so the book was heavily recommended to me by many...even given to me

I find it unreadable... i gave up about page 80...and i don't see myself trying again....

There are certain authors like Chabon and Ian McEwan that I don't get what people see in them...

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on June 05, 2014, 11:41:59 am
Bleeding Edge- Thomas Pynchon

Fun characters and dialogue, very loose plot.  Not as dense as his other works.

Here's a quote significant to our home away from home-

"9:30 Club... maybe he caught Tiny Desk Unit and Bad Brains in their local-band period... maybe the smell of the 9:30 Cologne is his last, his only link with the uncorrupted youth he was?"

Makes me wonder if Pynchon either knows from personal experience or has heard about the characteristic odor of the old club and that's what he's referencing (earlier mention of the F street location)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on June 05, 2014, 01:06:26 pm
If you like Goldfinch, you'll probably like the The Secret History (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-History-Donna-Tartt/dp/1400031702).

I may have preferred Special Topics in Calamity Physics (http://www.amazon.com/Special-Topics-Calamity-Physics-Marisha/dp/0143112120).  Same premise as Secret History but a bit younger and hipper.

I liked Secret History. Thought it was a bit too long, but really liked it.  That's why I read the goldfinch in the first place.  I will check out Special Topics in Calamity Physics.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 03, 2014, 10:33:46 am
Anyone read any Murakami and enjoyed it? If so, which novel would you suggest I start with? Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on July 03, 2014, 11:36:41 am
Anyone read any Murakami and enjoyed it? If so, which novel would you suggest I start with? Thanks in advance.

Love them all.  The Wind-up Bird Chronicle is his best but you should probably start with Norwegian Wood
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 03, 2014, 11:38:36 am
Wind-up Bird Chronicle ... Norwegian Wood
There's a Beatles joke somewhere in there, but I'm too lazy on a de facto Friday to suss it out.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on July 07, 2014, 08:14:38 am
Anyone read any Murakami and enjoyed it? If so, which novel would you suggest I start with? Thanks in advance.

Yes.  I loved 1Q84.  Currently reading "What I talk about when I talk about running" and it's great too (although it's non-fiction and I'm a runner, so that may be why I'm liking it so much).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 07, 2014, 11:42:55 am
I bought Wind-Up Bird and Kafka On the Shore over the weekend. Finished Wind-Up Bird already and about halfway thru Kafka (which I think is the better of the two so far). Might try reading 1Q84 before the "new" one comes out next month.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 25, 2014, 10:34:34 am
http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/books/2014/06/against_ya_adults_should_be_embarrassed_to_read_children_s_books.html

Thoughts?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 01, 2014, 01:52:46 pm
I'm so offended by the title of this article that I can't even bring myself to read it.  Books are books.  I read Hunger Games, Fault in our Stars, and others, and I"m not ashamed.  Who cares about the "intended" audience?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 01, 2014, 03:23:27 pm
I'm so offended by the title of this article that I can't even bring myself to read it.  Books are books.  I read Hunger Games, Fault in our Stars, and others, and I"m not ashamed.  Who cares about the "intended" audience?
I guess to play Devil's advocate, would you draw the same "who cares who it was intended for" for anything else? Should it be perfectly acceptable for adults to only find Pokemon or gi Joe acceptable entertainment, or would you label such a person as in a state of arrested development? What of they still wear bibs or use pacifiers?

Again, I say ask as someone who watches Pretty Little Liars every week.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 01, 2014, 03:42:54 pm
People want to wear pacifiers, fine with me.  Not hurting anyone there.

Yes, if people want to watch Pokemon, again, who cares?

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 01, 2014, 04:51:30 pm
People want to wear pacifiers, fine with me.  Not hurting anyone there.

Yes, if people want to watch Pokemon, again, who cares?


Ok, fair enough.

*walks out of thread*
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 07, 2014, 08:33:13 pm
I'm disappointed in you.

We didn't even get to talk about Bronys.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on August 07, 2014, 09:17:55 pm
I read Carl Perkins' autobiography....I'd give it a B
Guralnick's second volume on his Elvis bio..... so sad to read! good lord...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: i am gay and i like cats on August 07, 2014, 09:48:51 pm
I'm disappointed in you.

We didn't even get to talk about Bronys.

http://www.citypaper.com/blogs/noise/bcp-the-problem-with-bronies-20140801,0,1667255.story

http://kotaku.com/this-is-bronycon-1614758625

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bh2dH3b9stc
Title: Re: Books
Post by: dyecraig on August 09, 2014, 09:24:00 am
Joe by Larry Brown - even better than the Nicholas Cage movie, which was quite good!
Stardust (The David Bowie Story) by Henry Edwards and Tony Zanetta - appallingly written but unputdownable.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: dyecraig on August 09, 2014, 09:27:41 am
I read Carl Perkins' autobiography....I'd give it a B
Guralnick's second volume on his Elvis bio..... so sad to read! good lord...


Man, can this guy write a music biography.  The Sam Cooke bio - now, if not already.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 10, 2014, 10:19:53 am
Anxiously awaiting the Murakami new one. Should get it Tuesday.

I tried the Kindle thing, but I need book books.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 10, 2014, 11:46:47 am
Anxiously awaiting the Murakami new one. Should get it Tuesday.

I tried the Kindle thing, but I need book books.
My local indie bookstore is doing a midnight release party at a sushi restaurant. I'm thinking of going.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: James Ford on October 03, 2014, 08:20:49 am
This one is highly entertaining.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41V%2Bl8nW3NL.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 03, 2014, 09:06:23 am
^^ I read that last year when it came out. Thought the OJ/Kareem chapter was really good. The central thesis that the bad guy is whoever "knows the most and cares the least" is an interesting conversation starter as well.

I'm re-reading some Russian novels after my 6-book Murakami kick. Finished Fathers and Sons by Turgenev last week and about halfway through The Idiot right now.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 03, 2014, 09:41:27 am
I bought Wind-Up Bird and Kafka On the Shore over the weekend. Finished Wind-Up Bird already and about halfway thru Kafka (which I think is the better of the two so far). Might try reading 1Q84 before the "new" one comes out next month.

I also liked Kafka on the Shore best.  1Q84 is very good as well, although it could have been a tad shorter.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 03, 2014, 09:45:10 am
I bought Wind-Up Bird and Kafka On the Shore over the weekend. Finished Wind-Up Bird already and about halfway thru Kafka (which I think is the better of the two so far). Might try reading 1Q84 before the "new" one comes out next month.

I also liked Kafka on the Shore best.  1Q84 is very good as well, although it could have been a tad shorter.
I turned up reading all three of those, Colorless, Hardboiled Wonderland, and Sputnik Sweetheart. I really enjoyed them all.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: James Ford on October 03, 2014, 10:41:45 am
When do you guys who read four hours a day and also watch tv five hours a day have time to cook dinner? Sleep? Have a girlfriend?

It doesn't compute!  :o
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 03, 2014, 10:48:11 am
When do you guys who read four hours a day and also watch tv five hours a day have time to cook dinner? Sleep? Have a girlfriend?

It doesn't compute!  :o
According to this thread's tracking of it, I've read 7.5 books in 3 months, to the very day. (This is also during the summer which is when most TV programs are on hiatus, and therefore I don't have 5 hours of programming -- apparently -- to watch daily.) I don't know how quickly you read, but for the average person, that doesn't work out to 4 hours per day. Perhaps you have a learning disability?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on October 03, 2014, 01:46:52 pm
I bought Wind-Up Bird and Kafka On the Shore over the weekend. Finished Wind-Up Bird already and about halfway thru Kafka (which I think is the better of the two so far). Might try reading 1Q84 before the "new" one comes out next month.

I also liked Kafka on the Shore best.  1Q84 is very good as well, although it could have been a tad shorter.


I turned up reading all three of those, Colorless, Hardboiled Wonderland, and Sputnik Sweetheart. I really enjoyed them all.


You've got to read South of the Border, West of the Sun
Title: Re: Books
Post by: shemptiness on October 25, 2014, 11:54:28 am
Ooh, this looks very cool....

(http://www.goodmusicguy.com/wp-content/plugins/authpro/content-builder/assets/images/images/Play%20On%203D%20Cover%20-%20Vol%201.jpg)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/binky-philips/play-on-power-pop-heroes-book_b_6004986.html?utm_hp_ref=entertainment&ir=Entertainment
Title: Re: Books
Post by: RatBastard on October 25, 2014, 06:29:17 pm
I envy those of you who not only have the ability to read in the common sense of the word but more so are not stricken with dyslexia as badly as I am and thus just cannot read.  The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish.  Quite a labor.  How the hell I made it through four years of college I'll never know.  The one book I have always wanted to read (made it about ½ way through chapter 1 a few times) is One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 25, 2014, 08:11:27 pm
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: RatBastard on October 25, 2014, 08:14:04 pm
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....

Yep it does.  It explains that reading disabilities can be overcome! And to think, I did not lean on a gubmint handout to make me better either.  :)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 25, 2014, 10:50:51 pm
Last book I read was Rod Stewart's autobiography...

quite interesting.. I have to say much like his career its pretty good til about 1975...

I was curious if he would admit to stealing Jorge Ben's Taj Mahal for the music of if ya think i'm sexy or whatever that hideous song is called....He does...

but about 1975 or when he moves to LA the book begins to be all about the blondes and hardly at all about the music....boring....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 25, 2014, 10:51:41 pm
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....

Yep it does.  It explains that reading disabilities can be overcome! And to think, I did not lean on a gubmint handout to make me better either.  :)

it explains your ignorance is what it does...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: RatBastard on October 26, 2014, 12:00:02 am
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....

Yep it does.  It explains that reading disabilities can be overcome! And to think, I did not lean on a gubmint handout to make me better either.  :)

it explains your ignorance is what it does...

Me thinks you need to do a bit of research into the meaning of certain words.  In actuality though, reading is not the only way to gain knowledge, in fact it could be argued that it is one of the poorest ways depending on the reader.  Nighty night.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 26, 2014, 12:25:41 am
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....

Yep it does.  It explains that reading disabilities can be overcome! And to think, I did not lean on a gubmint handout to make me better either.  :)

it explains your ignorance is what it does...

Me thinks you need to do a bit of research into the meaning of certain words.  In actuality though, reading is not the only way to gain knowledge, in fact it could be argued that it is one of the poorest ways depending on the reader.  Nighty night.

you're right man...listening to rush limbaugh is the way..

what are you talking about? Reading is bad now?

I cannot believe you just wrote that you haven't read a book since 1981.....wow...just wow
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 26, 2014, 12:26:46 am
and Ratbastard..if you haven't read a book since 1981 this is the wrong thread for you man..

how about you start a thread for cruises or something?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 27, 2014, 08:53:43 am
My husband and I are reading Station Eleven right now. So far, so good. I'm a sucker for a good dystopia.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on November 03, 2014, 10:37:10 pm
I've had copies of this book for years but finally got around to it...Ian McEwan's "Saturday"


boy..its a tour de force....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: RatBastard on November 03, 2014, 11:58:38 pm
The last book I read was the Lord Of The Rings trilogy which I read while I was in the Marine Corps from 77-81.  It took me the entire four years to finish. 


this explains oh so much....

Yep it does.  It explains that reading disabilities can be overcome! And to think, I did not lean on a gubmint handout to make me better either.  :)

it explains your ignorance is what it does...

Me thinks you need to do a bit of research into the meaning of certain words.  In actuality though, reading is not the only way to gain knowledge, in fact it could be argued that it is one of the poorest ways depending on the reader.  Nighty night.

you're right man...listening to rush limbaugh is the way..

what are you talking about? Reading is bad now?

I cannot believe you just wrote that you haven't read a book since 1981.....wow...just wow

I'll let you figure out what fallacy of logic you just committed in that (poor) line of reasoning (particularly the 2nd line).  But I'm not one that enjoys reading for pleasure.  There are a lot of people who don't.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: RatBastard on November 03, 2014, 11:59:37 pm
and Ratbastard..if you haven't read a book since 1981 this is the wrong thread for you man..

how about you start a thread for cruises or something?

Merely because I do not enjoy reading does not mean I am not interested in what books others find to be of value.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on November 04, 2014, 09:18:40 am
I've had copies of this book for years but finally got around to it...Ian McEwan's "Saturday"


boy..its a tour de force....

He wrote Atonement? That book made me angry!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on November 04, 2014, 09:32:25 am
I've had copies of this book for years but finally got around to it...Ian McEwan's "Saturday"


boy..its a tour de force....

He wrote Atonement? That book made me angry!

yeah he wrote that... it may be his most acclaimed book.. i couldn't stand it myself! that's why I didn't read Saturday til now..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on December 11, 2014, 10:31:24 am
(http://dura-dundee.org.uk/files/2014/05/atocha.jpg)

Ben Lerner - Leaving The Atocha Station

Ostensibly about a spliff-smoking pill-popping post-grad poet on a fellowship in Madrid.  Really about language and art; the majestic inadequacy of the former and the fugitive profundity of the latter. Great stuff. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on December 11, 2014, 10:43:32 am
Ostensibly about a spliff-smoking pill-popping post-grad poet on a fellowship in Madrid.  Really about language and art; the majestic inadequacy of the former and the fugitive profundity of the latter.
That's an excellent sentence.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Got Haggis? on December 11, 2014, 11:06:46 am
i've been reading Flash Boys by Michael Lewis - its about the tech behind high frequency trading on wall street....and how its been exploited.  it's fascinating.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 03, 2015, 10:04:13 pm
I've read three books by William Boyd the past few weeks.... a new discovery for me... A Good Man in Africa is perfect....Really reminds me of Maugham and Greene....two of my favorite authors...

I'm now reading Anthony Burgess' Napoleon Symphony...

I just learned that Boyd was one of the two people who delivered a eulogy at Burgess' funeral.....everything ties together

2014 was probably my best year yet as far as reading books.. I think I made it through about 40 including some magnificent ones (i.e., All the Kings Men)

I find it interesting how much I tend to prefer British to American writers....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: miss pretentious on January 04, 2015, 01:28:15 pm
I'm about 60 pages into the Alex Chilton bio...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on January 05, 2015, 01:26:10 pm
Over the break I read Station Eleven (good, but had some issues with it), Martian (cool story and very science-y, worth it if you like space), Wild (I liked it, but been told it's a chick book), and started The Secret History of Wonder Woman (about 100 pages in, and it's good! very interesting!)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on January 05, 2015, 04:06:17 pm
I find it interesting how much I tend to prefer British to American writers....
and bands
(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NzMxWDEwMjQ=/$(KGrHqFHJFQE92!yimYbBPgF18E-vw~~60_35.JPG)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on January 06, 2015, 10:47:11 am
I am about a hundred pages into this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41tvvA12O0L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Fluency in patois is helpful but not required.  A steady soundtrack of Studio One comps is a prerequisite (Trojan will do in a pinch).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on January 07, 2015, 12:49:58 pm
Just finishing this one.

http://www.amazon.com/Infidel-Ayaan-Hirsi-Ali/dp/0743289692/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1420649185&sr=1-1&keywords=infidel

As someone who grew up under the spell of fundamentalist Christianity and eventually found my way, shed my religion, and understood the repressive lunacy of the doctrine, I totally understand this woman's journey. Fortunately, I was not a member of a religion which prescribes death to those who leave it. A real eye-opener by a boldly courageous, feminist woman.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Seth Hurwitz on January 08, 2015, 01:10:49 pm
reading several at once

Zen & The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance
Spalding Gray's Journal
Moby DIck
Cant' We Talk About Something More Pleasant (Roz Chast)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on February 03, 2015, 12:44:34 pm
I was certain the AP announcement on my phone this morning was announcing her passing, but alas:

Harper Lee to Publish a New Novel (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/04/books/harper-lee-author-of-to-kill-a-mockingbird-is-to-publish-a-new-novel.html?_r=0)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 03, 2015, 12:55:52 pm
I was certain the AP announcement on my phone this morning was announcing her passing,
That would be horrible. Someone else took her in my death pool.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on February 03, 2015, 01:26:10 pm
That would be horrible. Someone else took her in my death pool.

At 88, she can't be worth that many points.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 03, 2015, 01:30:15 pm
At 88, she can't be worth that many points.
You guys have a scoring system that rewards younger deaths? That's cool.

Ours is rotisserie draft style, and each celebrity can be selected up to 4 times. (First person to select them has them for 4 points, second person is only gets 3, third person gets 2...)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on February 03, 2015, 03:04:27 pm
Don't believe the hype, the Miranda July novel is AWFUL.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on July 01, 2015, 02:49:29 pm
Getting books from library book sales means reading books that may not exactly be current, but they still may be relevant and/or interesting.

I read this one recently:

The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn

by Diane Ravitch

The title is pretty self explanatory. This review sums it up nicely.


Diane Ravitch's The Language Police shines a light on a dark secret in k-12 education, namely the scandalous undermining of content standards in k-12 textbooks due to a collusion between textbook publishers and censors aimed at shielding children from anything that even remotely could be considered harmful or offensive to potential educational consumers. I had heard a few "Ripley's Believe It or Not" stories about this phenomenon -- for example, a university colleague of mine who had written a widely used high school civics text told me recently how he was asked by a California textbook review board to eliminate a diagram depicting the classic "layer cake" model of American federalism, lest it encourage kids to eat junk food -- but only after seeing Ravitch's book did I realize just how far this sort of lunacy had gone. The book meticulously documents its argument with an enormous amount of scholarly evidence, and equally meticulously tries to demonstrate that both liberals and conservatives are at fault for this problem. Ravitch has no ideological axe to grind here. She takes shots at both political correct feminists and others on the left as well as religious conservatives and others on the right, and anyone in-between who would deny our children a subtantively strong, academically sound education. It is a must-read for anyone concerned about the dumbing down of American education and the movement away from serious, free inquiry in our schools.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on July 01, 2015, 02:52:09 pm
I'm currently reading:

The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest

by Anatoli Boukreev


which documents the tragic events on Mt Everest in May 1996. The same events were coverered in Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer, which I've already read. It will be neat to go back in read that one again and compare the different writer/climber's versions.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walk,on,by on July 01, 2015, 03:00:35 pm
I am reading this, it is great, so go read it, right now

dan simmons  -  the terror and hyperion

about to start this, so go read, it too, right now

Vincent di paolo  -  my beloved friend, judas
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 14, 2015, 03:04:12 pm
Anyone getting Go Set A Watchman? I was really hyped for it when it was first announced but the ensuing details revealing it's basically a failed first-draft of what became Mockingbird (wherein Atticus is a racist) that is basically being released without Lee's permission -- and by some accounts knowledge at all -- has me rethinking it. Memories of my purchase of The Original of Laura are wafting back. . .
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walk,on,by on July 14, 2015, 03:17:52 pm
im waiting for the band name of

racist atticus

or

atticus is a racist
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on July 14, 2015, 03:19:41 pm
I'll read it. Mockingbird is one of my all-time favorite books, so there's no way I can pass on this.

Similarly, when all the demos for Psychocandy hit the internet, I snatched them up and really enjoyed listening to them.

What's the difference?

Title: Re: Books
Post by: walk,on,by on July 14, 2015, 03:20:18 pm
speaking of books, try reading this one . . . good lord, the words and ideas, are so, out there.

the power of now  -  Eckhart Tolle
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on July 14, 2015, 03:22:30 pm
Anyway, here's what I'm reading right now:

Home-Toilet Book

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41%2BVOzgk6CL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Home-Bedside Table Book

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41PplPT-ywL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Downstairs Lounge Book

(http://www.adweek.com/fishbowldc/files/2014/05/HRC-FINAL-Jacket.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 14, 2015, 03:38:36 pm
What's the difference?
Well, the demos for Psychocandy were, presumably, not marketed as a "new JAMC album." Passing off an early, complete-different, racist depiction of a character as a "sequel" changes the narrative of that character, whether intended or not. And also, right or wrong, the publishing of work against the writer's expressed wishes is viewed quite differently in the literary world as compared to musical demos leaking (which is probably an interesting TAN conversation), and there does seem to be serious misgivings about Lee's ability as an 89-year old blind and mostly deaf person in hospice/eldercare (whose longtime executor just passed away) to articulate her wishes in the matter.

That said, I'm not intending to tell people "YO. DON'T READ THIS BOOK, MILKSHITTER!" just attempting to have a discussion about the merits and ethics of this release. I think you definitely have the right idea going into reading it with the idea it's "bonus material" left on the cutting room floor.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on July 14, 2015, 03:46:10 pm
The original version of "Shout at the Devil" was called "Shout with the Devil" and instead of beginning with "He's the wolf crying lonely in the night, he's the blood stain on the sta-a-a-age" it began with "I'm the wolf crying lonely in the night, I'm the blood stain on the sta-a-age."

The original version of "The Drugs Dont' Work" has the lyric "They just make you worse, but I, know I'll see your face again" though the original went "The drugs don't work, they just make me worse, but I, know I'll see your face again."

Works change and evolve. I can't speak to the fact that it was published over her wishes, but I think that's just people mythologizing Lee because she's still alive. If an unpublished Hemingway book surfaced, would we be having this discussion? I doubt it. Watchman is a piece of literary history and should be released.

Also, I haven't read very much about this apart from the Gawker-style headlines of "You'll Never Guess How Atticus Finch Became a Racist Because Oh My God!!!!!" but I'd like to think that in Mockingbird, Scout visualizes her father as a heroically honorable god among men in the same way children do with their parents, like my own for example. Later, as an adult however, she realizes the reality is that all men are flawed, especially her father who can now be seen as the racist he always was.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on July 14, 2015, 03:48:53 pm
One final point: most people's impressions and knowledge of Mockingbird are based on the movie, not the book. Those who have really absorbed the book know that while the two are, of course, similar, there are marked differences in tone and perspective between them. The book does not deal or focus nearly as much on the trial as the movie does.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 14, 2015, 04:01:53 pm
If an unpublished Hemingway book surfaced, would we be having this discussion? I doubt it.
This exact issue happened with Nabokov. And Kafka. And is currently occurring with Salinger. The posthumous release of unfinished works by authors -- and especially those who instructed their work to be destroyed/not published -- is literally a huge ethical debate in the literary world.

. . .but I'd like to think that in Mockingbird, Scout visualizes her father as a heroically honorable god among men in the same way children do with their parents, like my own for example. Later, as an adult however, she realizes the reality is that all men are flawed, especially her father who can now be seen as the racist he always was.
See, I would argue that's the exact opposite way one should view it. By most accounts, Lee sent Watchman in and was told in a letter from the publisher, "hey, that character doesn't work, make him better and tell us a story through young Scout's eyes." Thinking the character of Atticus was always supposed to get older and espouse racist views (and, if you follow the logic, wasn't really attempting to be an agent of change but was just a lawyer doing his duty) kind of changes what the Mockingbird was trying to say if you ACTUALLY view it as an intended sequel.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on July 14, 2015, 04:02:14 pm
The book does not deal or focus nearly as much on the trial as the movie does.
Absolutely.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 14, 2015, 01:36:57 pm
Booker Prize winner is a book by Marlon James called A Brief History of Seven Killings


Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 14, 2015, 02:22:06 pm
I am about a hundred pages into this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41tvvA12O0L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Fluency in patois is helpful but not required.  A steady soundtrack of Studio One comps is a prerequisite (Trojan will do in a pinch).


Definitely fits in with the Booker's move away from "readability" over the last few years.  It's an excellent book, but you have to be really invested in it. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on October 14, 2015, 03:02:35 pm
The Martian
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 14, 2015, 03:02:52 pm
I am about a hundred pages into this:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41tvvA12O0L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Fluency in patois is helpful but not required.  A steady soundtrack of Studio One comps is a prerequisite (Trojan will do in a pinch).


Definitely fits in with the Booker's move away from "readability" over the last few years.  It's an excellent book, but you have to be really invested in it. 

gonna try to read it but I gotta say I'm not into slang of any sort... for example graham swift's last orders..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on October 14, 2015, 03:13:37 pm
You are against slang but use the words gonna and gotta in your sentence? 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 14, 2015, 05:32:27 pm
You are against slang but use the words gonna and gotta in your sentence? 


oops
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walk,on,by on October 14, 2015, 05:43:59 pm
boomma
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 15, 2015, 09:58:54 am
I just read The Water Knife and really liked it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bearman🐻 on October 15, 2015, 10:16:59 am
This:
(https://bookpeopleblog.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/dsdd-npr-music-slide-2.jpg?w=812)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 15, 2015, 11:02:40 am
Thanks for that recc. Loved him.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: jeffml on October 15, 2015, 05:07:51 pm
Just bought new Elvis Costello book.  Only read the front cover and so far it is brilliant.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 15, 2015, 08:37:54 pm
Just bought new Elvis Costello book.  Only read the front cover and so far it is brilliant.

 :D
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on October 16, 2015, 09:06:59 am
Just bought new Elvis Costello book.  Only read the front cover and so far it is brilliant.
excellent, as I only buy books for the cover
twofer!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on October 16, 2015, 01:52:40 pm
I read this on my most recent trip...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51A-1n1N91L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on November 02, 2015, 09:46:16 am
I finished "Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl" this weekend. It was fantastic.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on November 02, 2015, 09:59:38 am
I finished "Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl" this weekend. It was fantastic.

I have this sitting at the top of my to-read pile. I heard it's a little breezy but ultimately a lot of fun.

Just finished this and like it a lot:

(http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1427755996l/25246228.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on November 02, 2015, 10:21:26 am
I finished "Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl" this weekend. It was fantastic.

I have this sitting at the top of my to-read pile. I heard it's a little breezy but ultimately a lot of fun.

Just finished this and like it a lot:

(http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1427755996l/25246228.jpg)

that cover is an ad for not smoking...

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on November 02, 2015, 10:28:09 am
I finished "Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl" this weekend. It was fantastic.

I have this sitting at the top of my to-read pile. I heard it's a little breezy but ultimately a lot of fun.

Just finished this and like it a lot:

(http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1427755996l/25246228.jpg)

that cover is an ad for not smoking...


although his liver went, not his lungs
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on November 02, 2015, 10:30:34 am
Reed was a ?monster? of a man, who used racial slurs, abused women and fought with fellow artists.  ?He was a suspicious, cantankerous, bitter, angry man.  It was the worst-kept secret in show business,? (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/fashion/who-was-the-real-lou-reed.html)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on November 02, 2015, 10:41:45 am
I've finished lately Purity by Franzen, Dangling Man by Bellow, The Namesake by Lahiri, and Goodbye Columbus by Roth. All were quite good, the Lahiri was the best of the four.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on November 02, 2015, 10:49:47 am
Reed was a ?monster? of a man, who used racial slurs, abused women and fought with fellow artists.  ?He was a suspicious, cantankerous, bitter, angry man.  It was the worst-kept secret in show business,? (http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/fashion/who-was-the-real-lou-reed.html)
really don't think that was ever a secret
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on November 30, 2015, 12:06:50 pm
Top of my Holiday List:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41uvqsrV3HL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Pop music
Bopping brilliant

The story of how pop was made?and who made it
Nov 14th 2015 | From the Econmoist print edition

The Song Machine. By John Seabrook. Norton; 338 pages; $26.95. Jonathan Cape; £18.99.

EVERY musical genre has its canon: Bach and Mozart for classical, Armstrong and Parker for jazz, Dylan and the Beatles for rock, Biggie and Tupac for hip-hop. Only pop music?the ?bubble gum? or ?teenybop? tunes played on nightclub dance floors and Top 40 radio?lacks similar critical analysis and acclaim. True, Michael Jackson has been given his due. But it took an early death for the public to value his contributions fully. And no one would mention today?s ?manufactured? stars, such as Katy Perry (pictured) or Miley Cyrus, in the same breath as the King of Pop.

John Seabrook takes another tack. ?The Song Machine?, a history of the past 20 years of pop music, takes for granted two assumptions, both convincingly demonstrated via a highly engaging narrative. The most basic is that modern ?earworm? pop is a high art form, as worthy of appreciation as any other: he calls Kelly Clarkson?s ?Since U Been Gone? ?magnificent?, for example, and the ?hooks? (catchy, repeated snippets of melody) in Rihanna?s ?Umbrella? are ?wonderful? and ?lovely?. The second is that the public unfairly dismisses such masterpieces, because its expectations of the creative process were set during the rock ?n? roll era, when singer-songwriters were the norm. In fact, the 1960s and 1970s were a historical aberration, and what may seem like a soulless new wave of industrial music production is a return to the ?hit factories? of years gone by.

During the first half of the 20th century, many of the biggest names in popular music were not performers but songwriters, based on the stretch of West 28th Street in New York known as Tin Pan Alley. Whether solo composers like Cole Porter and Irving Berlin or inseparable duos like George and Ira Gershwin or Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, these hitmakers remain far better known than the singers who performed their work. Much of early rock, including many Elvis Presley classics, was written by teams in or around the Brill Building in midtown Manhattan. And even after folk rockers and the Beatles established a precedent that performers should write their own material, Motown maintained a musical assembly line that would have made Henry Ford proud.

The protagonists of ?The Song Machine? are not headliners like Taylor Swift, but rather the men (they are indeed mostly men) behind the music. Mr Seabrook sees their ascent as the product of broader social trends. One thread that runs consistently through his tale is technological disruption. The advent of computerised music software in the 1970s made virtuosic instrument-playing or singing redundant: producers could obtain any sound they wanted synthetically, and string together vocals by using the best individual syllables from a large number of takes (?comping?) and running them through a pitch corrector. Subsequently, the advent of internet downloading shifted the primary unit of musical consumption from the album to the single. That sharply increased demand for melodic hooks, to lock listeners in within the seven seconds before they are likely to turn the radio dial.

These inventions shifted the balance of power from performers to production teams. Today, the process starts with producers laying out beats and chords. They then recruit ?topliners?, who are often women, to try out melodies and vocal snippets and see what sticks. Lyrics are an afterthought. The finished product is shopped around to star singers, who do their best to ?preserve the illusion? of authorship. ?I get this feeling of a big painter?s studio in Italy back in the 1400s,? one Swedish artist says in the book. ?One assistant does the hands, another does the feet...and then Michelangelo walks in and says, ?That?s really great, just turn it slightly...Next!?? The book is full of cautionary tales of singers whose careers went off the rails when they rebelled against their labels and demanded creative control.

The second engine of change in ?The Song Machine? is cultural globalisation. The Cole Porters of today hail primarily from Scandinavia: Max Martin, a Swedish über-producer, has written more chart-topping hits than the Beatles. Mr Seabrook thinks it is no accident that American listeners have become hooked on tunes from abroad. Although white artists borrowed from African-American blues in the early days of rock, by the 1990s black music had moved on to spoken, beat-focused hip-hop, while white bands like Nirvana screeched with dissonant grunge rock.

By contrast, Sweden, the country that produced ABBA, never lost its appetite for soaring melodies. Its government offered free music education. Moreover, its artists were not constrained by racial boundaries in American music, and could produce ?a genre-bursting hybrid: pop  music with a rhythmic R&B (black) feel?. And because English was not their first language, they were free to ?treat English very respectless?, as Ulf Ekberg of Ace of Base, a band, says, ?and just look for the word that sounded good with the melody?.

Mr Seabrook clearly enjoys writing about pop music. He walks readers through the hits measure by measure. Britney Spears?s single ?...Baby One More Time?, he writes, ?is a song about obsession, and it takes all of two seconds to hook you...first with the swung triplet ?Da Nah Nah? and then with that alluring growl-purr...Then the funky Cheiron backbeat kicks in, with drums that sound like percussion grenades.? He paints vivid pictures of his protagonists; Ms Spears was ?scared? the first time she saw Mr Martin?s ?lank hair, a fleshy grizzled face...and the sallow skin of a studio rat?. And he brings little-known stories to life, from the con man who developed the Backstreet Boys and ?N Sync and is now in prison for fraud, to a singer who delivers a laugh-out-loud funny, profane tirade against Ms Perry for ripping off her song title ?I Kissed A Girl?.

?The Song Machine? will not lead anyone to confuse Mr Martin and his partner, Lukasz ?Dr Luke? Gottwald, with John Lennon and Paul McCartney?even Mr Seabrook makes clear that his first love remains classic rock. But getting clubgoers out of their seats and drivers bopping in their cars is its own rare kind of genius.

From the print edition: Books and arts

To illustrate, the hits of Max Martin. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuRC3KpnmVg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on November 30, 2015, 12:26:38 pm
Now THAT looks interesting
Title: Re: Books
Post by: excontradiction on November 30, 2015, 12:56:17 pm
Max Martin is the subject of the latest episode of Switched on Pop (http://www.switchedonpop.com/).  (Haven't listened yet.)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on December 03, 2015, 04:53:58 pm
Top of my Holiday List:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41uvqsrV3HL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Oh man, I just went to my office's Free Book shelf and this was sitting right in front like a ripe red tomato. ZING!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on December 03, 2015, 05:29:51 pm
Oh man, I just went to my office's Free Book shelf and this was sitting right in front like a ripe red tomato. ZING!

NO SPOILERS!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2016, 01:15:33 pm
found another copy of PLease Kill Me so Sidehatch can keep the book he apparently has no intention of returning to me..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 01:35:37 pm
Oh man, I just went to my office's Free Book shelf
I imagine there have got to be some good finds there
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 01:36:13 pm
found another copy of PLease Kill Me so Sidehatch can keep the book he apparently has no intention of returning to me..
it's not that I don't intend to...just never think about it the 3-4 times a year I actually see you in person
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bob72 on February 04, 2016, 01:36:39 pm
I finished "Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl" this weekend. It was fantastic.
This is on my up next

Currently in the middle of Mudhoney: The Sound and the Fury from Seattle

Just finished Feeding Back: Conversations with Alternative Guitarists from Proto-Punk to Post-Rock It wasn't quite as insightful as I had hoped, but still a good read
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 04, 2016, 01:37:37 pm
I am enjoying Danielewski's The Familiar serial series.

I also finished (a compilation of) Kant's Political Writings and Roth's Patrimony which are both good.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 04, 2016, 02:28:40 pm
Now that I am going to have to use the Metro to get to work for an unknown amount of time (we lost our parking lot...), I will be needing books to read while on the train.  Right now I have a few on deck - all of the books Bret Easton Ellis wrote, and the Songs of Fire and Ice series...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 02:36:02 pm
Oh man, I just went to my office's Free Book shelf
I imagine there have got to be some good finds there

There are some great finds there, but it involves going up to 4th floor and scanning hundreds of books, most of them dumb novels. But I always find enough of them to keep me involved in several good ones at a time. Right now I'm reading these:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51jEArQlKLL.jpg)
(http://d28hgpri8am2if.cloudfront.net/book_images/onix/cvr9781476763798/why-the-right-went-wrong-9781476763798_lg.jpg)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5158WHTZDdL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

My goal is 100 books this year. I've got 6 completed and the ACC book will be done in a couple days.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 02:36:55 pm
I have to say that I legitimately teared up several times reading the ACC book. Valvano's and Smith's deaths were pretty heartbreaking.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 02:39:36 pm
Quote
all of the books Bret Easton Ellis wrote

The Rules of Attraction is one of my favorites and never really got mass appeal
I also liked the informers, but not as much

LtZ is OK,
 but American Psycho is so great and disturbing at the same time
the context of the 80s NYC is important to the story

Got to meet him during the Lunar Park book tour
I liked that book, but really 'fans only' book IMO
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 04, 2016, 02:43:10 pm
Also:
The Informers (1994)
Glamorama (1998)
Imperial Bedrooms (2010)

(I plan on reading all of the books this year)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 04, 2016, 02:44:23 pm
Quote
all of the books Bret Easton Ellis wrote

The Rules of Attraction is one of my favorites and never really got mass appeal
I also liked the informers, but not as much

LtZ is OK,
 but American Psycho is so great and disturbing at the same time
the context of the 80s NYC is important to the story

Got to meat him during the Lunar Park book tour
I liked that book, but really 'fans only' book IMO
Rules Of Attraction is the only thing he wrote that I didn't think was total ass.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 02:50:51 pm
Also:
The Informers (1994)
Glamorama (1998)
Imperial Bedrooms (2010)

(I plan on reading all of the books this year)
I listed Informers - and I liked it

 
BEE has two 'scene's' in different books that take place in bathtubs that have stuck with me for decades.  I can't seem to shake them and still give me the chills


I do love how he name drops music constantly, for me that was an element that always made his stuff much more enticing ...well the drugs and sex too

Glamarama  (SPOLIER alert)...started off good, but really couldn't buy the idea of super models becoming terrorists.  Any story about with models as the main characters is a bad idea to me

I think I read 10 pages of IB...so can't comment
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 04, 2016, 02:52:16 pm
Glamarama  (SPOLIER alert)...started off good, but really couldn't buy the idea of super models becoming terrorists.  Any story about with models as the main characters is a bad idea to me
Glamorama aka "Not Inspiration for Zoolander..."
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 02:52:36 pm
Got to meat him
whoa...that was quite the Freudian slip
but my misspellings and poor grammar is legendary on this board...so why change now
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 04, 2016, 02:54:16 pm
I listed Informers - and I liked it
Oops.  Your punctuation made me think that the Informers mention was part of your Rules of Attraction sentence and I missed it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2016, 05:59:02 pm
so rereading please kill me .. i had not realized a lot of the stooges stuff is pulled direclty from iggy's book i need more... which i am also reading

anyways, kinda sad rereading it even if it is the best book ever .. since i read it last about 4 years ago bowie, lou reed, and rock action have passed.. also tommy ramone
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 06:10:27 pm
Yeah I've read Please Kill Me probably a dozen times. One of my favorite books.

Legs McNeil also wrote this:

(http://files.ebook.bike/cover/119062.png)

The first half, when the porn industry started getting big in the 70s, is the best part. But it spends WAY too much time on the John Holmes/Wonderland murders and it felt like the second half was all about the mob and not nearly enough about Amber Lynn, Nina Hartley and Seka. So, kinda disappointing and as a result, I've only read it 5 or 6 times.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 06:13:51 pm
That said, has anyone noticed how oral histories are so much more common now with music/sports/entertainment books? They can be really interesting if well-edited but I feel like this is a lazy way to create a book.

I mean, the best rock books are the ones that have a clear, well-written narrative. And creating that is hard! But if you're doing an oral history, you basically just edit the transcripts of your interview and call it a book. It's like an outline with quotations. Feels like the easy way out, kind of a cousin to the 'found footage' film genre. I came up with that simile as I was writing it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bob72 on February 04, 2016, 06:17:36 pm
(http://persephonemagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/CopyCat-David-Yow-600x600.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2016, 06:18:39 pm
That said, has anyone noticed how oral histories are so much more common now with music/sports/entertainment books? They can be really interesting if well-edited but I feel like this is a lazy way to create a book.

I mean, the best rock books are the ones that have a clear, well-written narrative. And creating that is hard! But if you're doing an oral history, you basically just edit the transcripts of your interview and call it a book. It's like an outline with quotations. Feels like the easy way out, kind of a cousin to the 'found footage' film genre. I came up with that simile as I was writing it.

Totally agree.. its lazy and  is only as good as the source material NOT the "author".. the Pixies oral history was pretty poor.. I still want to read the one about Janes

For the Savage book on punk I find the interviews far more interesting in a way than the actual book..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 06:22:25 pm
I've read Whores, the Jane's book. Since I'm a HUGE Jane's fan, I gobbled it up and re-read it often. But it's so obvious that all of the quotes from the bandmates themselves are from past interviews (which the author admits). I don't think they contributed to the book itself at all.

In fact, when reading a subpar oral history, you can always tell right away who cooperated and who didn't. For example, Eric A's sister clearly made herself available for as much as the authors wanted because she shows up on every damn page commenting on shit, even when Eric A was long out of the band. Perry's old gf Casey also was around with nothing to do because it seems like she's got multiple quotes per page, even after she was long out of the picture.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 06:26:34 pm
This was another laughably terrible oral history

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5121hDhxBzL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

I'd say a good 95 percent of the quotes are from random dudes who opened for Nirvana in Kansas City in 1989. So if you were curious what Les Thugs or the bass player from Tad had to say about Kurt's suicide, here's the book for you!

I don't think I recognized the name of a single person quoted in this book. It was just a lot of guys like Daniel Kenowski (guitar tech for Pond).

That said, this was a great oral history on that era:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/512RIxXj4PL._SX325_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2016, 06:27:44 pm
interesting.> I also heard the Replacements one is pretty bad....just a bunch of people talking about how great they were ...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 06:33:12 pm
Sorry, I'm being overbearing here. I just read that Replacements one. I thought it was really good. If anything, the takeaway I... uh... took away from it is that Paul and Tommy were pathologically self-destructive. And not just "let's drink and drug ourselves to death", I mean like desperately needing money, receiving some, and then using it to buy a broken down golf cart or lighting it on fire. Those guys just sabotaged themselves at every single opportunity.

It was pretty fun to read Bob Mould's simmering rage as he describes how hard he and Husker worked the circuit and did everything DIY and then the Replacements stumbled in, said they didn't want to do any work, demanding roadies and assistance, and then got the major label deal.

Also, the whole Bob Stinson thing is such a heartbreaker. Dude was just so damaged from his childhood.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Seth Hurwitz on February 04, 2016, 08:38:52 pm
I am reading War & Peace and quite enjoying it
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 04, 2016, 09:50:35 pm
By candlelight, right grampa?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Seth Hurwitz on February 04, 2016, 11:22:57 pm
Yes I am old
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on February 04, 2016, 11:28:04 pm
love how it's 100% ok to give seth shit
and he just rolls with it
de-mock-racy
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2016, 11:43:11 pm
I have yet to finish it myself...I have trouble with novels by russians...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 04, 2016, 11:50:23 pm
I have yet to finish it myself...I have trouble with novels by russians...
I actually love the classic Russians. Prefer Anna Karenin if we're talking Tolstoy specifically.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 05, 2016, 10:26:30 am
love how it's 100% ok to give seth shit
and he just rolls with it
de-mock-racy


I'm a divorced, bald 45 year old shadow of a man. The number of people I can rip on is dwindling rapidly. I take my spots when they emerge.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 05, 2016, 10:31:44 am
^sorry to hear that



as a rule-with exceptions- I'm not a fan of novels from the "get paid by the word" (serialized) period of literature....some of these books just go on and on and on and on...it feels like they had to drag them out as long as they could.. kind of like a Latin American soap opera or something.. but I admire anyone who can get through these things....I am embarassed never to have finished some classics even though I seem to recall having passed English without reading them
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 05, 2016, 10:49:09 am
as a rule-with exceptions- I'm not a fan of novels from the "get paid by the word" (serialized) period of literature....some of these books just go on and on and on and on...it feels like they had to drag them out as long as they could.. kind of like a Latin American soap opera or something.. but I admire anyone who can get through these things....I am embarassed never to have finished some classics even though I seem to recall having passed English without reading them
I get that if you're talking Dickens or someone whose work was actually serialized and published in a magazine and paid by the word. That was, however, assuredly not the case with War and Peace. There's a lot of long Russian novels, but unless I am gravely mistaken, none of them were serialized releases; that was a uniquely English thing at that time.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 05, 2016, 10:49:41 am
I'm a divorced, bald 45 year old shadow of a man.
Divorced? What was all that "my wife never puts out" business you were going on abo-- ohhhhhhhhhhh. . .
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 05, 2016, 02:42:05 pm
as a rule-with exceptions- I'm not a fan of novels from the "get paid by the word" (serialized) period of literature....some of these books just go on and on and on and on...it feels like they had to drag them out as long as they could.. kind of like a Latin American soap opera or something.. but I admire anyone who can get through these things....I am embarassed never to have finished some classics even though I seem to recall having passed English without reading them
I get that if you're talking Dickens or someone whose work was actually serialized and published in a magazine and paid by the word. That was, however, assuredly not the case with War and Peace. There's a lot of long Russian novels, but unless I am gravely mistaken, none of them were serialized releases; that was a uniquely English thing at that time.


well serializing of works was very popular in the second half of the 19th century.. mademe bovary was serialized, brothers karamazov, anna karenina and even war and peace (in an earlier form) were all serialized..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 05, 2016, 02:43:27 pm
forgot to replace the periods with commas.. my bad.. habit..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 05, 2016, 02:55:35 pm
as a rule-with exceptions- I'm not a fan of novels from the "get paid by the word" (serialized) period of literature....some of these books just go on and on and on and on...it feels like they had to drag them out as long as they could.. kind of like a Latin American soap opera or something.. but I admire anyone who can get through these things....I am embarassed never to have finished some classics even though I seem to recall having passed English without reading them
I get that if you're talking Dickens or someone whose work was actually serialized and published in a magazine and paid by the word. That was, however, assuredly not the case with War and Peace. There's a lot of long Russian novels, but unless I am gravely mistaken, none of them were serialized releases; that was a uniquely English thing at that time.


well serializing of works was very popular in the second half of the 19th century.. mademe bovary was serialized, brothers karamazov, anna karenina and even war and peace (in an earlier form) were all serialized..
I'm sure you'd agree there's a difference between, say, Great Expectations where the author was paid by the word and had a financial motivation to keep the story going on as long as possible vs Tolstoy/Dostoyevski giving portions to a periodical for printing (or David Foster Wallace/Franzen doing the same today in The New Yorker) as the book is being written. Great Expectations is long for length's sake. I never got that feeling with the Russians.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 10, 2016, 04:00:27 pm
What?? ??
http://edition.cnn.com/2016/02/10/entertainment/harry-potter-part-8-publish-summer-feat/index.html
Quote
Harry Potter is back for another round of magic, struggles with the darkness and parents.

This time, Harry's the dad, struggling with his own son.

The eighth installment of the Harry Potter series, the two-part play, "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child," will be published as a book this summer, author J.K Rowling announced on her Pottermore website Wednesday.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 10, 2016, 04:02:05 pm
What?? ??
She likes money.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 10, 2016, 04:03:44 pm
You do know she is one of the world's top charitable people, right?  ::)
http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/juice/content/jk-rowling-drops-forbes-billionaire-list-because-she-gave-so-much-away
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 10, 2016, 04:04:00 pm
It's interesting to me that she's re-visiting a world that she'd ended neatly and nicely. I mean, she just published an adult fiction book and it was a big hit! I don't know why she feels the need to go back to this trough again so quickly. Yes, of course, $$$ but A) she's already got a lot of it, and B) she appeared to be en route to making $$$ with a new line of books.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 10, 2016, 04:05:05 pm
She loves the characters and the world she created.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 10, 2016, 04:05:49 pm
She loves the characters and the world she created.
Can we kick this over to the nerd alert thread please?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on February 10, 2016, 04:07:23 pm
Yes, let us please cater to you.  What else do you require?

Plenty of people on here would be interested in Harry Potter, and would never click on the nerd thread, so I do not see any reason to segregate this book from any other.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on February 10, 2016, 04:09:22 pm
Yes, let us please cater to you.  What else do you require?
I mean, I could use a gin and tonic if you're in the area. . .
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on February 10, 2016, 04:46:16 pm
Has anybody read "When Breath Becomes Air" By Paul Kalanithi?

The review in the Economist (http://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21690011-intimate-essential-memoir-meaning-he-lay-dying) made it sound amazing. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on February 11, 2016, 08:15:36 am
Yes, let us please cater to you.  What else do you require?

Plenty of people on here would be interested in Harry Potter, and would never click on the nerd thread, so I do not see any reason to segregate this book from any other.

I just got back from totally nerding out at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal for a few days (which if you haven't been there, and you're a fan, I would highly recommend.) So, this is great news!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 25, 2016, 01:23:35 am
I need help...this has been an outstanding matter for a few years..

you know that book Night by Elie Wiesel?

a different edition was originally published in 1955 or 1956 in Argentina through the Polish Yddish Labor Union... It was a much longer and different work.. its in yddish which is a bitch as i don't speak that obviously.. but i want to get a copy of it and try as i try i just can't find it.. obviously its a very rare book...it was part of a series of like 150 book of jews remembering the holocaust..

there is some controversy regarding the book but i'm not interested in dredging that up

any ideas where i could find the book? here is the info.. I have never seen it anywhere alhtough I have seen a picture... often the short different "Night" is listed when you search for Un di velt hot geshvign (someting like "and the world slept")..

Un di velt hot geshvign.

Author:   Elie Wiesel
Publisher:   Buenos Ayres, Tsentral-Farband fun Poylishe Yidn in Argentine, 716, 1956.
Series:   Poylishe Yidnṭum, bd. 117.
Edition/Format:      Print book : Biography : YiddishView all editions and formats
Database:   WorldCat

some list the author as Eliezer Wiesel

and more of the basic info:

1954: Un di Velt Hot Geshvign
Wiesel wrote in 1979 that he kept his story to himself for ten years. In 1954 he wanted to interview the French prime minister, Pierre Mendès-France, and approached the novelist François Mauriac, a friend of Mendès-France, for an introduction.[39] He writes: "The problem was that [Mauriac] was in love with Jesus. He was the most decent person I ever met in that field ... and he was in love with Jesus. ... Whatever I would ask ? Jesus. Finally, I said, 'What about Mendès-France?' He said that Mendès-France, like Jesus, was suffering ..."[40]

When he said Jesus again I couldn't take it, and for the only time in my life I was discourteous, which I regret to this day. I said, "Mr. Mauriac," we called him Maître, "ten years or so ago, I have seen children, hundreds of Jewish children, who suffered more than Jesus did on his cross and we do not speak about it." I felt all of a sudden so embarrassed. I closed my notebook and went to the elevator. He ran after me. He pulled me back; he sat down in his chair, and I in mine, and he began weeping. ... And then, at the end, without saying anything, he simply said, "You know, maybe you should talk about it."[40]
Wiesel started writing on board a ship to Brazil, where he had been assigned to cover Christian missionaries within Jewish communities, and by the end of the journey had completed an 862-page manuscript.[41] He was introduced on the ship to Yehudit Moretzka, a Yiddish singer travelling with Mark Turkov, a publisher of Yiddish texts. Turkov asked if he could read Wiesel's manuscript.[42] It is unclear who edited the text for publication. Wiesel wrote in All Rivers Run to the Sea (1995) that he handed Turkov his only copy and that it was never returned, but also that he (Wiesel) "cut down the original manuscript from 862 pages to the 245 of the published Yiddish edition."[43]

Turkov's Tzentral Varband fun Polishe Yidn in Argentina (Central Union of Polish Jews in Argentina) published the book in 1956 in Buenos Aires as the 245-page Un di velt hot geshvign ("And the World Remained Silent"). It was the 117th book in a 176-volume series of Yiddish memoirs of Poland and the war, Dos poylishe yidntum (Polish Jewry, 1946?1966).[44] Ruth Wisse writes that Un di Velt Hot Geshvign stood out from the rest of the series, which survivors wrote as memorials to their dead, as a "highly selective and isolating literary narrative".[45]


I don't have thousands of dollars to pay to some guy dealing in judaica... I would also note that Argentine printings tended to be and continue to be pretty shoddy so finding a copy of a book that must have had a very very limited run that is still serviceable would be doubly hard...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 25, 2016, 01:26:36 am
here is the picture of the book i just posted about.. even a picture is hard to find!


https://www.google.com/search?q=Un+di+Velt+Hot+Geshvign&biw=1920&bih=945&tbm=isch&imgil=N8h4Ug60Jvtm1M%253A%253BHOtDu4_H4e0weM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.yiddishbookcenter.org%25252Fslideshow%25252Fvoices-from-holocaust&source=iu&pf=m&fir=N8h4Ug60Jvtm1M%253A%252CHOtDu4_H4e0weM%252C_&usg=__RjoH5EDpTNDp5SACu6vuozTqVnE%3D&dpr=1&ved=0ahUKEwivoqi1lpLLAhWFPD4KHSFIA4sQyjcISw&ei=H5DOVu-WNIX5-AGhkI3YCA#imgrc=N8h4Ug60Jvtm1M%3A
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 25, 2016, 01:31:29 am
hmm.. maybe there is an actual copy here..

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?R=1642722

and another

http://www.queenslibrary.org/es/item/un-di-velt-hot-geshvign

maybe i will have to go to queens to make a copy...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on April 28, 2016, 04:54:04 pm
I don't think we've talked about this here.

http://awfullibrarybooks.net/

I had to shut my door when I got to

http://awfullibrarybooks.net/crafts-for-the-retarded/

and

http://awfullibrarybooks.net/satan-for-kids/
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on April 29, 2016, 08:55:41 am
I'm about 110 pages into Petty, by Warren Zanes, a book my wife got me for Xmas. Tom has just completed the debut album with the Heartbreakers. I now know a whole lot more about Mudcrunch.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 29, 2016, 08:56:52 am
I'm about 110 pages into Petty, by Warren Zanes, a book my wife got me for Xmas. Tom has just completed the debut album with the Heartbreakers. I now know a whole lot more about Mudcrunch.

i've been getting psyched for seeing Petty and Mudcrutch at the 930... going to be great!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on April 29, 2016, 09:15:04 am
I'm about 110 pages into Petty, by Warren Zanes, a book my wife got me for Xmas. Tom has just completed the debut album with the Heartbreakers. I now know a whole lot more about Mudcrunch.

I read this. I thought it was all right though nothing really stood out about it. Maybe Tom Petty is just kinda boring. But it felt like one of those bios where this happened and then this happened and then this happened and then the end.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 29, 2016, 09:15:41 am
yeah I heard the book was a slog so I'm not planning on getting it..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on April 29, 2016, 09:21:38 am
You wanna talk slog, how about a 854 page biography on Paul McCartney

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51t5p8ayj%2BL._AC_UL320_SR206,320_.jpg)

That said, I'm liking this quite a bit and will probably finish it this weekend. I've read every book on the Beatles that I can find, so diving into this seemed a little unnecessary, but I have it a shot and it's really pretty good. Having read a bio on Ringo a few months ago, and a Lennon one before that, I like reading about the Beatles era through the perspective of just one of the members rather than a whole-group view.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on April 29, 2016, 09:22:13 am
I'm about 110 pages into Petty, by Warren Zanes, a book my wife got me for Xmas. Tom has just completed the debut album with the Heartbreakers. I now know a whole lot more about Mudcrunch.

I read this. I thought it was all right though nothing really stood out about it. Maybe Tom Petty is just kinda boring. But it felt like one of those bios where this happened and then this happened and then this happened and then the end.

Sounds a lot like my life except I'm not in Mudcrunch.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 29, 2016, 09:23:05 am
You wanna talk slog, how about a 854 page biography on Paul McCartney

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51t5p8ayj%2BL._AC_UL320_SR206,320_.jpg)

That said, I'm liking this quite a bit and will probably finish it this weekend. I've read every book on the Beatles that I can find, so diving into this seemed a little unnecessary, but I have it a shot and it's really pretty good. Having read a bio on Ringo a few months ago, and a Lennon one before that, I like reading about the Beatles era through the perspective of just one of the members rather than a whole-group view.

yeah but Phillip Norman is like the authority on the Beatles isn't he? I think I read his first one on the Beatles...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on April 29, 2016, 09:32:38 am
Yeah, he wrote a big bio on Lennon, which I liked a lot, and he wrote an overall Beatles book called 'Shout' which is funny because the Beatles didn't record that song or even play it very much.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 17, 2016, 11:57:26 am
Read Zero K by DeLillo which was merely OK. Did not live up to the "his best novel since Underworld" hype that was flying around.

Also read The Secret History after hearing from multiple people that I needed to check out Tartt's two pre-Goldfinch books. It was a solid B+. Would recommend to anyone who liked Goldfinch.

Also read The Plot Against America by Roth which was a lot of fun and wildly timely with Trump being a major party candidate.

Finally got around to reading Interpreter of Maladies recently too (somehow had read all her other stuff sans the thing she actually won a Pulitzer for). So good. One of my favorite authors. She can write things that are nostalgic and sad all at once. Sorry to hear she's stopping writing in English.

About 2/3rds of the way through the new Klosterman. It's an interesting thought experiment. Enjoying it.

Next up is Vol 3 of Danielewski's The Familiar serial. Enjoyed the first two but I'm a sucker for ergodic lit.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on June 21, 2016, 12:15:26 pm
Anybody read The Sympathizer or All The Light We Cannot See? Trying to figure which to read first.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on June 21, 2016, 12:22:33 pm
I just read  Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon. Nice job, Kim. Thurston is an idiot.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bob72 on June 21, 2016, 12:58:12 pm
I just read  Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon. Nice job, Kim. Thurston is an idiot.
I'm in the middle of that one. I never knew she had such ties to Hollywood and the art world even before SY existed. I love that she dated Danny Elfman in high school.

I also read Carrie Brownstein's in one sitting, but I was a bit disappointed with it. I wanted more than just S/K history, would love to know more about the relationship with Fred.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on June 21, 2016, 01:16:07 pm
I just read  Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon. Nice job, Kim. Thurston is an idiot.
I imagine this is pretty biased.   ::)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on June 21, 2016, 01:44:53 pm
I just read  Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon. Nice job, Kim. Thurston is an idiot.
I imagine this is pretty biased.   ::)

Middle aged guy leaves his wife and family for a woman 28 years younger than his wife. Seems like it would be pretty hard to tell the story in a way where the middle aged guy doesn't seem like a total piece of shit.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on June 21, 2016, 01:48:04 pm
Again, you are only hearing one person's side of the story.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on June 21, 2016, 01:55:47 pm
Yes, the facts that we, the public, know about Kim and Thurston's break-up make Thurston look like a dick. And if he cheated on his wife and she never cheated on him, then he's some level of a dick. But there is no way that Kim's account is a credible objective telling of what happened. Maybe she had an affair before him? Maybe there was an understanding between them that out-of-wedlock trysts were ok? Maybe she is a toxic abusive person? Maybe she's a pathological liar?

Personally, I've never really liked her that much. She's always seemed overly impressed with herself and what an artiste she is.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: killsaly on June 21, 2016, 01:56:30 pm
^ exactly
Title: Re: Books
Post by: dyecraig on June 21, 2016, 02:08:35 pm
^ yup.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on June 21, 2016, 02:31:28 pm
Again, you are only hearing one person's side of the story.

Here's his side of the story.

http://www.stereogum.com/1668021/thurston-moore-on-his-marriage-ending-affair-im-in-a-really-romantic-place/news/
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bob72 on August 08, 2016, 01:37:45 pm
Upon advice given by several of you I dove into Please Kill Me this weekend and though I'm only 75 pages into it and not yet past the MC5/Stooges era yet I have to say it's def a good read.

A lot of people (usually younger people) will argue whether or not The Stooges are actually punk, but if any of these accounts are even partially true, the were pretty much punk as fuck. I mean who rolls around on stage in a broken beer bottle the crowd throws at you?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: dyecraig on August 08, 2016, 01:41:23 pm
^ yes!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 08, 2016, 01:43:23 pm
Anybody read The Sympathizer or All The Light We Cannot See? Trying to figure which to read first.
Went with All The Light first and it was fantastic. Highly recommended.

About 3/4th of the way through The Sympathizer and it's very good but not as good as the forementioned book.

Going to a book release party on Saturday for Hard Red Spring (https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Red-Spring-Kelly-Kerney/dp/0525429018/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470678115&sr=8-1&keywords=hard+red+spring) by local Richmond author Kelly Kerney. The New Yorker review made it sound really good and the excuse of party is a good motivator to actually purchase this.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 09, 2016, 09:47:47 am
Has anyone read Paul Beatty's The Sellout or Emma Cline's The Girls and have thoughts/recommendations on either?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: dyecraig on August 09, 2016, 09:57:29 am
"going to hell in a hen basket - an illustrated dictionary of modern malapropisms" by robert alden rubin
lol funny.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 09, 2016, 10:29:05 am
Has anyone read Paul Beatty's The Sellout or Emma Cline's The Girls and have thoughts/recommendations on either?

I really liked The Girls. Loved her language and the description of the friendship. A little on the nose, but still an enjoyable read. I would be interested to know if men enjoy this book, or if it's more for women.

I've been on a bit of a tear with books lately. Really enjoying Underground Airlines.

Also read Before the Fall, Girls on Fire, How to Build a Girl - all of which were just ok

This Little Life (which was great, but tore me apart and put me into a bit of a depression)

Time Traveller's Wife (definitely a book for girls, I think, but the first book ever to mention Big Black)

Modern Lovers (don't believe the hype, this book was absolutely AWFUL)

LaRose was also pretty good. Still not quite sure how I feel about this one.

Another book I really liked was The Water Knife. It came out last year.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 09, 2016, 10:32:34 am
This Little Life (which was great, but tore me apart and put me into a bit of a depression)
This one has been on my radar for a bit with the Man Booker nomination. Might need to add this to my forthcoming amazon order.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 09, 2016, 10:33:35 am
This Little Life (which was great, but tore me apart and put me into a bit of a depression)
This one has been on my radar for a bit with the Man Booker nomination. Might need to add this to my forthcoming amazon order.

Just be in a really great mood when you begin. That books literally will tear you down and then stomp on you.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 09, 2016, 10:35:12 am
This Little Life (which was great, but tore me apart and put me into a bit of a depression)
This one has been on my radar for a bit with the Man Booker nomination. Might need to add this to my forthcoming amazon order.

Just be in a really great mood when you begin. That books literally will tear you down and then stomp on you.
Cool. Thanks for the feedback (and the feedback on The Girls too).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on August 09, 2016, 11:18:10 am
Has anyone read Paul Beatty's The Sellout or Emma Cline's The Girls and have thoughts/recommendations on either?


I highly recommend The Sellout.  Brilliant satire!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on August 09, 2016, 08:07:01 pm
starting James Brown's autobiography....we'll see...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 09, 2016, 08:35:07 pm
Has anyone read Paul Beatty's The Sellout or Emma Cline's The Girls and have thoughts/recommendations on either?


I highly recommend The Sellout.  Brilliant satire!
Thanks for the recommendation!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 22, 2016, 10:01:38 am
I really liked The Girls. Loved her language and the description of the friendship. A little on the nose, but still an enjoyable read. I would be interested to know if men enjoy this book, or if it's more for women.
Finished this on Saturday. I'm sort of of two minds about the book. She's obviously an immensely talented writer. She has a talent for layering short descriptive sentences about something one after another and weaving this really well-written tapestry. But on the other hand, I sort of found the overriding story not that great. She's someone who I think will put out an amazing book at 36, but probably she isn't full cooked at 26. I did not think it was only for women although I think women will probably more immediately relate to the "Suzanne-obsession" element more than men.

Started A Little Life and obviously that's going to take me a few weeks at 720 pages of very, very small font. It hasn't gotten brutal yet but several people have warned me its just gratuitously awful to the main character so I'm bracing myself.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on August 23, 2016, 08:59:44 am
I really liked The Girls. Loved her language and the description of the friendship. A little on the nose, but still an enjoyable read. I would be interested to know if men enjoy this book, or if it's more for women.
Finished this on Saturday. I'm sort of of two minds about the book. She's obviously an immensely talented writer. She has a talent for layering short descriptive sentences about something one after another and weaving this really well-written tapestry. But on the other hand, I sort of found the overriding story not that great. She's someone who I think will put out an amazing book at 36, but probably she isn't full cooked at 26. I did not think it was only for women although I think women will probably more immediately relate to the "Suzanne-obsession" element more than men.

Started A Little Life and obviously that's going to take me a few weeks at 720 pages of very, very small font. It hasn't gotten brutal yet but several people have warned me its just gratuitously awful to the main character so I'm bracing myself.

Agree. Some of her sentences just knocked me dead. But, that is what I meant by a little too "on the nose". The overall story was just ok.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: brennser on August 23, 2016, 10:06:29 am
I just read "the Power of the Dog" at the beach - an oldie but a goodie
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on September 14, 2016, 11:59:44 am
Started A Little Life and obviously that's going to take me a few weeks at 720 pages of very, very small font. It hasn't gotten brutal yet but several people have warned me its just gratuitously awful to the main character so I'm bracing myself.
This book is just fucking brutal.

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on September 14, 2016, 12:00:25 pm
Has anyone read Paul Beatty's The Sellout or Emma Cline's The Girls and have thoughts/recommendations on either?


I highly recommend The Sellout.  Brilliant satire!
Just got on the Man Booker shortlist. It's up next if I ever can bring myself to finish the literary torture porn that is A Little Life.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on September 27, 2016, 01:02:20 pm
Finally finished A Little Life. That was a tough read. Excellent book but very depressing.

Started White Teeth by Zadie Smith which I somehow have never gotten around to reading. (My order for The Sellout and Brief History of Seven Killings is taking forever to get delivered so The Sellout isn't up next like I said but they're the next two in my literary queue.)

Does anyone else use GoodReads?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on October 04, 2016, 11:59:36 am
Two books about the Boss.

Just finished "Bruce" by Peter Ames Carlin.

Currently reading "God is not Great, How Religion Poisons Everything" by Christopher Hitchens.

Both good reads.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bob72 on October 06, 2016, 12:40:52 pm
Just started this one:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41nujsj-lwL.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on October 06, 2016, 01:47:49 pm
These are the ones I've recently finished and liked a lot

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51LI%2BbQ%2BzuL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51eh6DvQlnL.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Xl8ayMWqL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

(http://scentofindia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/I-Am-Brian-Wilson-by-Brian-Wilson-Book-Review.jpg)

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_uBY5_ESJlI/Vh6i7iQFhqI/AAAAAAAADa4/NkMLxKfOYyA/s1600/razzle.jpg)

(http://blogmedia.dealerfire.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/177/2015/01/drivinghonda.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 07, 2016, 11:40:32 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GXH9-dlRL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Fags, punks, and blue-bloods intersecting in NYC between the Bicentennial and the Great Blackout of 1977.  It's a long book but the writing is spectacular.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61MtmXFNOqL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Crap.  Pure and utter crap.  NPR Best Book of the Year.  Agatha Christie comparisons.  Turns out its really just incredibly flat characters, strained dialogue, and predictable plotlines.  I blame this book's success on this whole Gone Girl, Girl on a Train thing going on.  This will be a mediocre film at some point.  Perhaps I'll watch the film, because I abandoned the book after 150 pages, which I almost never do.

(http://media.npr.org/assets/bakertaylor/covers/f/fates-and-furies/9781594634475_custom-a1c60d0db7c4d3d9fce99ec338b463c8ea95ca03-s400-c85.jpg)

8 out of 10.  Great writing.  Almost all character development with the plot a conscious afterthought.  Some find it pretentious, but I get the sense it is a purposeful pretension that speaks to the characters.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walkie,talkie on October 07, 2016, 11:42:34 am
david lynch

catching the big fish




read it, bitch
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 07, 2016, 12:00:23 pm
I was not impressed with the Carlin book on the Boss.... it was too much an official unofficial bio.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 07, 2016, 12:16:15 pm
(http://media.npr.org/assets/bakertaylor/covers/f/fates-and-furies/9781594634475_custom-a1c60d0db7c4d3d9fce99ec338b463c8ea95ca03-s400-c85.jpg)

8 out of 10.  Great writing.  Almost all character development with the plot a conscious afterthought.  Some find it pretentious, but I get the sense it is a purposeful pretension that speaks to the characters.
This is on my To Read shelf in GoodReads. Your positive review will bump it up in my reading order.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 07, 2016, 12:22:32 pm
david lynch

catching the big fish




read it, bitch

That means it's been 10 years since I saw him at AFI Silver? Ugh.

City on Fire...not pretentious at all? I was worried I would feel how I felt about Infinite Jest.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walkie,talkie on October 07, 2016, 01:19:09 pm
Infinite Jest might stand alone as the most controversial book of all time. Controversial, in that no one can figure out whether it sucks or not.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 07, 2016, 01:24:32 pm
Infinite Jest might stand alone as the most controversial book of all time. Controversial, in that no one can figure out whether it sucks or not.
Its near-universal acclaim would disagree. Where is this Infinite Jest sucks movement you're citing?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 07, 2016, 01:35:39 pm
City on Fire...not pretentious at all?

I wouldn't call it "pretentious" but I would call it "ambitious," arguably overly so.  It's long and some parts drag.  Some characters could use a little more color.  Some of the intersecting plot lines are a little too neat.  Some of the symbolism comes up a little ambiguous.  Does it live up to its hype as the next Great American Novel?  Certainly not.  But wherever it comes up a little short it does so trying.  Wherever the plot drags or the coincidence strains credulity the writing more than compensates.  It was probably the easiest 900+ page book I've read.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 10, 2016, 09:31:14 am
Infinite Jest might stand alone as the most controversial book of all time. Controversial, in that no one can figure out whether it sucks or not.

I understood what it was trying to do, it was just way too pretentious for me.

Thanks for the City on Fire review. I'll attempt it this winter.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on October 28, 2016, 11:14:58 am
A well deserved Man Booker winner

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/business/media/paul-beatty-wins-man-booker-prize-with-the-sellout.html
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 28, 2016, 11:16:50 am
A well deserved Man Booker winner

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/business/media/paul-beatty-wins-man-booker-prize-with-the-sellout.html
I'm halfway through this and its uproarious. It's The Director: The Book. I told him that the other day.

Glad to see the Man Booker finally giving it to an American. I would like to see this become the de facto "best English language work of fiction" award over the Pulitzer.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on October 28, 2016, 12:04:55 pm
A well deserved Man Booker winner

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/business/media/paul-beatty-wins-man-booker-prize-with-the-sellout.html

I should be read side-by-side with Ta Nehisi Coates'  Between the World and Me
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 28, 2016, 12:15:47 pm
A well deserved Man Booker winner

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/26/business/media/paul-beatty-wins-man-booker-prize-with-the-sellout.html

I should be read side-by-side with Ta Nehisi Coates'  Between the World and Me
See, I disliked that a lot. The satire Beatty uses makes it a lot more palletable, imho.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on October 28, 2016, 12:48:14 pm
Wow!  I'd describe it as a beautifully wrought prose poem along the lines of a James Baldwin.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Seth Hurwitz on October 28, 2016, 06:52:21 pm
reading The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil

Patti Smith talked about him in her book

did anybody here go that thing?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walkie,talkie on October 28, 2016, 07:01:46 pm
one of my friends came up with an interesting idea on face,book

"Wanted - Participants for a book-loving social experiment. Comment if you want to participate and I?ll send you details. What do you have to do? Buy your favorite book and send it to a stranger (I?ll send you a name and address.) You will only be sending one book to one person. The number of books you will receive depends on how many participants there are. The books that will show up on your door are the other people?s much loved stories.  Who wants in?"

I thought it was a cool, idea.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on November 28, 2016, 10:27:56 pm
I'm reading William Boyd's latest.. Sweet Caress...


I find Boyd to be an absolutely masterful novelist.... love him but the entire time I read his books I'm dreading finishing them.. there are only so many Boyd novels...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on December 05, 2016, 12:13:50 pm
Reading The Underground Railroad. Very good so far. Not very cheerful, as the depictions of slavery are difficult, but I'm glad it doesn't hold back too.

Just finished Big Little Lies, which was more just a fun easy to figure out mystery than something really stirring.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on December 05, 2016, 12:22:28 pm
I'm struggling through Marlon James' A Brief History of Seven Killings.

Its a good book but each chapter comes from a different 1st person perspective narrator and the Jamaican patois/lack of proper punctuation makes it a very slow read.

Wanting to get into Mahajan's The Association of Small Bombs next.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 05, 2016, 03:42:56 pm
I'm struggling through Marlon James' A Brief History of Seven Killings.

Its a good book but each chapter comes from a different 1st person perspective narrator and the Jamaican patois/lack of proper punctuation makes it a very slow read.

Wanting to get into Mahajan's The Association of Small Bombs next.

I quit it...just way too confusing
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on December 05, 2016, 03:46:55 pm
I quit it...just way too confusing
Its gotten easier once I got past the first of the five days. Once you know who the characters are and don't have to flip back to the character list every paragraph it speeds up slightly.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on December 05, 2016, 04:09:14 pm
It all makes complete sense if you're totally blazed when you read it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on December 05, 2016, 04:13:40 pm
It all makes complete sense if you're totally blazed when you read it.
Hush, Bam Bam.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on December 05, 2016, 10:13:40 pm
(https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15337408_622447961276038_6957954575808074620_n.jpg?oh=333df82fc7755e9bf00bfbfda75d9ad0&oe=58F026FE)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walkie,talkie on December 05, 2016, 10:54:29 pm
I am reading this incredible book, that has to do with this spiritual medium woman who speaks to the dead to get life advice to allow people to become the most important person they can for themselves. It's like self motivation, times 1000, powered by the energy advise of the Dead.

It's somewhere in one of my bags or something so I can't remember the name of it, at the moment, so you'll have to give me a bit and then I'll tell you what it is.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: walkie,talkie on December 05, 2016, 11:09:16 pm
Its called,

Rebecca Rosen,     Awaken the Spirit Within
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on December 15, 2016, 03:50:06 pm
Kudos to the Fairfax County Public Library for having this one. 44 pages in and I'm liking it a lot.

Trouble Boys: The True Story of the Replacements by Bob Mehr



I started that one and put this one on hiatus. It's also very good, I'll return to it later.

Are You Ready for the Country: Elvis, Dylan, Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock by Peter Doggett



And of course I'm reading and enjoying the two homebrewing books that Sweetcell recommended in the beer thread.

Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 15, 2016, 04:03:27 pm
I'm reading Hitchens' last book of essays... I just read an interesting one about Jefferson and the Barbary pirates

I'm enjoying it..


He should almost be glad he died shortly after its publication as had he stuck around he would have been horrified to see just how badly things in the Middle East turned out and how wrong he was...although I doubt he would have acknowledged such..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 18, 2016, 10:53:40 pm
Hitchens' essay on Gore Vidal is pretty scathing...I find it rather uncharitable to focus on a man's last few writings when he is obviously way up there in age and has lost his partner for life to illness... I guess it was payback but still.. a nasty business..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 22, 2016, 10:12:04 pm
(http://i64.tinypic.com/15fje47.jpg)

man its a really fun and easy read....I could finish this very quickly...

I bought this First Edition hardcover (the only way to go for me when possible) used on Amazon..I think I ordered it yesterday for $10 (including shipping) and here it was early today... Amazon can be so great it can be disconcerting.. I note it used to belong to the Denver Public Library....I peeled off the usual bunch of stickers and they came off rather nicely..it still sports two red "Denver Public Library" stamps inside but that is ok... Next time I see Peter Hook he is going to sign this puppy.. and I will not lend it to sidehatch cause he still owes me the two books I lent him years ago.. I think he thinks I have forgotten but I do not forget..

anyways I had planned to go to a holiday party but my youngest one has an ear infection and had the worst cough going yesterday..we got him on antibiotics and my partner took the older one to the party... so the kid falls asleep immediately after they leave and I'm having a blast reading my book listening to some Isaac Hayes records I picked up this morning..sometimes the finer pleasures are the simplest ones...

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on December 23, 2016, 11:48:27 am
If you liked that, you should check out Hook's book on the Hacienda. I read it earlier this year and was totally enthralled with it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on December 23, 2016, 01:11:59 pm
.. Next time I see Peter Hook he is going to sign this puppy.. and I will not lend it to sidehatch cause he still owes me the two books I lent him years ago.. I think he thinks I have forgotten but I do not forget..

have not forgotten...but they just look so nice in my book case

 but hopefully your oldest isn't sick today after going to that party
mine was puking all through the night...so I hope that wasn't spread around all the kids at the party who were playing pile-on (I think yours avoided most of the bedlam)

Was good seeing Ms Hutch and 1/2 your clan
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 27, 2016, 09:50:50 am
oh he was fine.. gosh he loves parties..


anyways..so I'm reading the Peter Hook Joy Division book and Hook writes that Barney came up with the picture for Unknown Pleasures... I was surprised by that... but according to Hook he came up with the picture from some astronomy book and gave it to Peter Saville who turned it into the cover.. also, I did not realize Barney had worked as a graphic artist (although he kind of makes fun of him) and according to Hooky had a big part in their designs etc....

I'm on about page 200...very easy quick read..

I ordered the Hooky bio of New Order and the Sumner bio... I hear the Sumner bio is rather a downer... I also read that Stephen Morris is coming up with his own bio...which is hard to imagine as he seem the most reticent.. but if Sumner could do it


as others have commented it is rather strange to read anything coming from the band themselves as they were always so quiet.. that was part of the allure.. all you had was those images... a band that never gave one interview...

but I guess, lets face it, they're pretty much done...

it is interesting to read how Hooky and Barney both agreed that they hated the way Uknown Pleasures came out due to Hannett's work (they wanted it to be punkier and sound more like the Sex Pistols) even if Hooky now agrees with everything Hannett did.. that is not the case with Closer which I guess they both hated then and Hooky still hates... then Hooky said they got Hannett to produce the first New Order album and fired him because he was making Barney sing the same song 50 times.. apparently Hannett just couldn't handle Ian dying while at the same time turning into a huge coke fiend....also interesting to read that Chris Nagle was Hannett's assistant...I did not know that...Nagle is a name most Manchester scene acolytes will recognize...from his work with the Inspirals and Charlatans..

lastly I had no idea Factory had been set up as a vehicle to get Durutti Column's music released and that the original album The Return of the Durutti Column came in a sandpaper sleeve and that the guys from Joy Diviison assembled them and Ian Curtis stamped them (they were broke I guess and would take these kind of jobs at Factory) which is why they now go for huge dollars.. i guess people feel like when they get this album they're getting something Ian personally handled...I have the second issue of this album .. I really can't see forking over $500 for one...

Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 29, 2016, 07:46:46 pm
ok i finished it..


fascinating stuff ... I didn't really have a clue beforehand...I now have a little tiny clue.. the book definitely does not answer many of the questions any fan would have... but I doubt - these many years later and with so many interests having developed not to mention people's issue with their own actions- we will ever have a real clue..  Joy Division is a pretty amazing story... it all happened within about 3 years!


Substance (the one about New Order) is arriving tomorrow....
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 30, 2016, 02:23:23 pm
Peter Hook Substance has arrived....I bought an ARC copy...I noticed a typo already..... sad to say it looks like Mr. Hook spends his time equally on each period.. so if you are like me and you think New Order kind of lost it after 1989 and that later music doesn't do as much for you well he's going to devote equal time to it....I could read an entire book on Technique or Power COrruption and Lies...Republic or Waiting for the siren? umm not so much...


The Bernard Sumner book also arrived......a  little bit thin a tome but you take what the guy gives you...

I'm torn on which one to read first... if I read Peter Hook its like continuing but I'm kind of interested more in Bernard not only because he is the true genius of the two but also to balance Peter Hook's account on Inside Joy Division...

Peter Hook really can be a right twat.. he even penned a scathing review of the Sumner autobiography in Billboard.. who the fuck does that? Peter Hook....I mean dude, its Sumner's right to write his own book.... he didn't take issue with all the "lies" he may feel he found in your book! Come to think of it I really doubt he read your book.

I will report back on my choice, the consequences that led to making that choice and the highlights of the actual reading...stay tuned.. of course if you have any input that you think could sway my decision let me know..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 02, 2017, 02:34:21 pm
I thought Bernard's book was good but the overall style of it is a true reflection of him, so instead of Hook's bouncy, emotionally colloquial prose, Bernard's is much more subdued and diplomatic. It is a little frustrating how he seems to experience no highs or lows -- even when TWO of his groups take off into the stratosphere -- but I still liked it a lot.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 03, 2017, 08:39:41 am
well... I've read Bernard's book until about page 180 of 300..to sum it up I would say I'm gobsmaked... so far I would divide his book in three.. first part was all about a horrible or let us say challenging childhood (who knew?) he takes great pains to say is not horrible....then a lot about Joy Division with great insight/stuff about Ian.... then in depth about his emerging love of NYC dance/club music and discovery of synthesizers...

For me just fascinating... first of all until only recently I had no idea the synths were Bernard.. I thought that was what they hired Gillian for!...to now read that Bernard spent night after night back in 1979 or 1980 putting together a synthesizer by hand or reading about how he got into samplers back in 1981-1982 is pretty fascinating...

I also had no idea how Sumner came to be the lead singer of New Order.. apparently after Ian died their manager Rob Gretton- for all practical purposes a fifth member of JD/ND-  books a low key short tour of the US where he has all three- Bernard, S. Morris and Hooky sing each night on the tour... then after the last show he tells Bernard "You got the job"...and that was it..then they hire Gillian because Sumner can't sing and play instruments at the same time live...

I agree with Relaxer about the matter of fact nature of the book.....being a bit strange.. there is a transition around when New Order takes off where it just seems like Bernard loses interest and he's just all over the place going from JD to Pretty in Pink movie and BLT within the space of 1 page and you're like eh what? Then he rewinds back into an in depth discussion of sequencers and Blue Monday... its like after JD he was like "OK geez I just spent over 100 pages on JD and now I got to tell the New Order story of the past 30+ years? There is no way!"
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on January 04, 2017, 02:01:36 pm
Finished Brief History of Seven Killings which was a long read but one I enjoyed more and more each hundred pages. Great book.

After a couple arduous reads in a row, I feel I need something I can chew through a little quicker so I'm revisiting Roth's American trilogy (American Pastoral, I Married A Communist, Human Stain).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 09, 2017, 02:30:59 pm
Man Peter Hook in his book Substance.. some glaring bullshit

He says Bauhaus ripped off his bass line on ICB for Bela Lugosi's Dead... he says it in a humblebrag style like much of his book.. he is the king of humblebragging.. anyways, only problem is ICB came out in 1981 and Bela came out in 1979!

He talks about how some bands play the same songs every night.. says he saw Bruce twice in a row and both nights Bruce played the same set list and even said the same things between the songs... Now I have to doubt Bruce playing the same gig on back to back nights although its possible.. but he is not a good example of that point! I mean Bruce is really well known for switching it up night to night..

I gotta be honest.. the book reads like a lot of bullshit.... I am enjoying it but so much name calling of Bernard Sumner..its a little ridiculous calling your bandmate a "twat" page after page... I mean really? If he was that bad I think you owed it to yourself to leave way sooner..

The other thing is Peter Hook claims to basically have been recording all the songs.. maybe with the engineer Mike Johnson.... like he had this huge role... but as far as making the music he has very little to say... Sumner's description I think fits much more which is that Hook simply overlaid his bass at times on parts of the songs....Hook also makes fun of Bernard for the lyrics repeatedly but in the same book says that they ALL wrote them

And the biggest bullshit may be that he says he doesn't remember why Bernard got the job of lead singer... for someone who was obviously so competitive with Bernard it rings really hollow... he repeatedly accuses Sumner of basically trying to copy him (ie, he bought the car I bought, he wanted the girl I banged, etc.)...

Also, Peter Hook does a nice job explaining all the pranks and harassment he played on Ian Curtis but Bernard describes it differently saying it did take a toll on Ian.... Peter kind of admits to being embarassed by it but he did it and that is the fact.. when Ian was with Annika Peter really made fun of him.. Bernard says he didn't think it was any of his (Bernard's) business... There is also very little from Peter as far as Ian goes in explaining his own friendship with him... at least Bernard describes walking Ian through a cemetery and telling him "Hey look, you don't want to be there!" trying to knock some sense into him... its pretty clear Ian and Bernard were much closer...that does not make Peter a bad person but coupled with Peter basically hazing Ian- who was pretty vulnerable already with his epilepsy, troubled marriage with young baby, confusion about Annika)- its not a very pretty picture...

Its fascinating reading the two books because Bernard's book (at least until page 180) hardly mentions Peter whereas Peter just seems to go off on him constantly.. Peter's book - the way it describes the songwriting- its weird to understand exactly what he did a lot of the time.. a lot of the time his role seems to be to be "recording them" being whatever bernard and morris came up with with all their synths, guitars and drum machines... sometimes he provides a bass that he says Bernard used for the vocal lines but I don't know...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on January 10, 2017, 11:33:57 pm
this looks like it might be an interesting read

TOTAL CHAOS: The Story of The Stooges/As Told By Iggy Pop (Third Man Books) The first time the story of this seminal band has been told entirely in Pop?s own words
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 10, 2017, 11:52:39 pm
this looks like it might be an interesting read

TOTAL CHAOS: The Story of The Stooges/As Told By Iggy Pop (Third Man Books) The first time the story of this seminal band has been told entirely in Pop?s own words

well.. I agree it will be interesting as is anything related to Iggy but it is important to remember that Iggy has told the story before.. I have the book somewhere around here.....its kinda short... it covers his career until about 1980.. if you read any book - like Please Kill Me- they will use Iggy's book as source material when writing about the Stooges...Now of course we are many decades removed from most of the "action"....you have to wonder how much better his recollections will be than they were when he wrote his book



here is the book i'm talking about

https://www.amazon.com/need-more-Stooges-other-stories/dp/0943828503/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1484106631&sr=1-10&keywords=iggy+pop


but yeah I'll definitely read the new one.. they had a very limited autographed edition they sold last week to Third man vault subscribers ..it was like $250!!!

maybe he'll do a book tour but all rockers skip DC on the book tour circuit...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 17, 2017, 12:35:55 pm
Decided to take a walk to the Free Book Shelf in our office and lo and behold, there's 'Substance' by Peter Hook. Man, I grabbed that shit so fast. Looking forward to it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 17, 2017, 03:49:16 pm
Decided to take a walk to the Free Book Shelf in our office and lo and behold, there's 'Substance' by Peter Hook. Man, I grabbed that shit so fast. Looking forward to it.

wow nice score
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 17, 2017, 04:11:26 pm
It's one of the great perks of working here. I have to be really on the ball though, because the good titles always go fast and there's no rhyme nor reason as to when new books get put out on the shelves. I've tried to make friends with that group but they've resisted my charms.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 24, 2017, 05:17:12 pm
I'm about halfway through the Peter Hook/New Order book and I have to agree in total with Hutch. This book is entertaining because it's dealing with a band, a genre, and a time in history that I'm very interested in. But holy shit does he spend too much time whining and blaming and talking about how unfair Barney treats him. He wasn't nearly this boring in the Hacienda book, I have to say.

I'll finish this, but it's kind of a slog. And that's saying something because I read a LOT of music bios, of varying levels of quality. This one is in the lower tiers.

I think the worst autobio I've read is Scott Weiland's. Holy shit was that bad. You could tell he spent about 45 minutes with his ghostwriter talking about what an amazing person he is, and then peaced out to go drug out.

Brian Wilson's auto was a lot of fun to read. Sebastian Bach's was also pretty good. Tony Iommi's was funny because he just skates over all of his bad qualities. It was fun to read Lita Ford's auto right after, because she totally calls him out on all the things he doesn't mention. Also enjoyed Joe Perry's and Dave Stewart's books.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: bearman🐻 on January 24, 2017, 06:06:05 pm
Anybody read the Keith Morris book "My Damage"? I just finished it the other day and thought it was fantastic. Very candid. Makes me very glad that he is doing OFF because it sounds like he's never really gotten his dues. Definitely not one who has made the smartest financial choices or had the big sellout reunion tour to enjoy the benefits of his legacy as a legendary punk rocker.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 24, 2017, 06:27:31 pm
Yeah, I really liked it My Damage too. I had no idea he'd been sober for that long!

I also like how, unlike so many other autobios, Morris is all "Man, I can't do shit except sing, and even that I don't do particularly well." But dude is always hustling.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 01:38:14 pm
Just pulled these too off of the free book shelf. I'll definitely get into the Steve Jones one soon.

(https://www.thefix.com/sites/default/files/styles/article/public/steve-jones-lonely-boy-sex-pistols.jpg)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Cf9GeV0UMAIPw90.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 01:40:11 pm
Regarding the Spiders book, I like the rando autobios from guys who weren't the bandleader or front man. The bass player from Alice Cooper wrote his book last year and it was great! I liked seeing more of an insider's account (albeit biased) of how Alice broke up the band and went solo.

On the other hand, did I really need to spend a week reading the book by the drummer of Five Finger Death Punch? Probably?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Yada on January 25, 2017, 01:42:28 pm
One of my resolutions that I'm currently failing at was trying to read more books in 2017... When do you all find the majority of your time to read?

Do you have children?

What time do you go to bed?

If I'm lucky I have one, maybe two free hours a day and unfortunately reading typically falls down the priority list during that free time.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 25, 2017, 01:45:30 pm
i am really unhappy about steve jones not stopping by DC .. he went up to 3-4 bookstores in NYC area... did signings...

i even ordered some signed books from the strand  (they said they would get them signed but they cancelled order on me the next day.. i guess jonesy did not feel like sticking around to sign copies for the store in addition to the people there at the reading)... i was going to give one to sidehatch... back to the drawing board

too many musicians are totally skipping dc these days be it concerts or book signings...i got to write politics and prose a letter...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on January 25, 2017, 01:52:50 pm
Y'all are aware there are books written about things other than music, right?

*sigh*
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 02:06:35 pm
Of course. I just finished a great book about how Uber and Airbnb were created and spread around the world along with Steve Young's autobio and a great book about the Occupy Wall Street movement of a few years ago. But since this is a music-focused message board, I limited my talk to books about music.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 02:11:02 pm
As for the time thing, these are a couple factors that I'm pulling out of my ass as I type them.

I don't watch much tv apart from sports, so if there isn't a good game on and I'm home, my activity options are few. If I'm home with the kids that night, once they go to bed I have to occupy my next few hours in some way, and usually that's with a drink and a book

I also am reading several books at once, and they're stashed around the house so wherever I am, there's probably a book within reach. So I have my bathroom book, bedside table book, kitchen book, and living room book.

And also, I read books on subjects that I'm really interested in, which consists of music, sports, business, politics, culture, etc., so the prospect of, say, spending the night sipping scotch and reading a critical look at Putin's life sounds great.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on January 25, 2017, 02:25:49 pm
And also, I read books on subjects that I'm really interested in,
Chlamydia: An Oral History
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 25, 2017, 03:06:52 pm
BOOM!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on January 25, 2017, 05:35:04 pm
One of my resolutions that I'm currently failing at was trying to read more books in 2017... When do you all find the majority of your time to read?

Do you have children?

What time do you go to bed?

If I'm lucky I have one, maybe two free hours a day and unfortunately reading typically falls down the priority list during that free time.

I read on the train. 35 mins each way, five times a week.

If I weren't such a Netflix junkie, I'd have late night as well.

That said, I've been stuck on that Replacements book for quite a while.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on January 25, 2017, 08:45:26 pm
music is my favorite thing.. so i go through periods where I read a lot of music bios but i have to say the industry has changed.. now they seem to be publishing a lot more of these books..its become a huge market (rock star memoirs)....

i think it has been said that most of them aren't that great...the worst one EVER is the Eric Crapton one... dude, he is one horrible man and I did not need to know that... of course i think he is the most overrated musician ever but his book is all about his drug use and alcoholism sobriety with a lot of stuff about how he screwed everybody over..

anthony kiedis' book is also a lot about his battle for sobriety but that one i liked.. i had no idea what an interesting childhood he had.. slash's was also interesting (his mom knew bowie really well!)...

i also liked to get the signed editions of course.. i have the bernard sumner and david j signed ones!

dean wareham's is also good...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 11:16:33 pm
I've flipped through the Kiedis one a dozen times over the years but just never pulled the trigger on buying it. I'd def read it if it was on the free shelf, but only brand new titles show up there.

Slash's was good but you know what, Duff's "It's So Easy" was GREAT. I was really impressed with it and liked it a lot. Adler's is just depressing. A pretty good about Axl is "W.A.R." by Mick Wall. Actually I"m not sure if that's the right author, I'm lazy and drinking right now so I can't be arsed.

There's a new biography on Paul Simon that is awesome too. Lots of detail on what he did before hooking up with Garfunkel, and the whole chaos of his marriage to Carrie Fisher is really entertaining. Also fun to read about a short man's struggles with hair loss  ;)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 11:19:05 pm
Dave Stewart's was surprisingly good. I didn't give too much of a rip about the Eurythmics, but it was fun reading about how they came together as a couple, broke up, then started a world-famous band. PLus, dude has made records with everyone, so there's a lot of good rock and roll stories from over the decades.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on January 25, 2017, 11:22:15 pm
Tonight, I am very sadly going to finish this. Just started it Sunday night but its such a compulsive read. So good and fun, I never want it to end. I could read a 2,000 page account of this era of the NFL.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51BH0FBxtWL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on February 04, 2017, 09:54:40 pm
I'm reading James Brown's autobiography.. very good so far...it really is his voice...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: excontradiction on February 05, 2017, 01:29:43 pm
I'm reading James Brown's autobiography.. very good so far...it really is his voice...


He really puts the auto in autobiography.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on February 06, 2017, 10:03:40 am
One of my resolutions that I'm currently failing at was trying to read more books in 2017... When do you all find the majority of your time to read?

Do you have children?

What time do you go to bed?

If I'm lucky I have one, maybe two free hours a day and unfortunately reading typically falls down the priority list during that free time.

I don't have kids. I carve out time to read. Turn off the tv and go to bed at 8:15/8:30 and read until 9:30/10 or so.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on February 09, 2017, 11:01:23 am
Just pulled these too off of the free book shelf. I'll definitely get into the Steve Jones one soon.

(https://www.thefix.com/sites/default/files/styles/article/public/steve-jones-lonely-boy-sex-pistols.jpg)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Cf9GeV0UMAIPw90.jpg)

Follow-up having finished these.

The Woody book was fun to read, gives a cool inside account of Bowie post-Space Oddity when he was seen as a novelty and one-hit wonder. It's a shame that the Bowie focus fades once he kills off the Spiders, but it's pretty interesting to read about he navigated the music industry after Bowie.

The Steve Jones book is a hoot. One thing I liked about Peter Hook's book is when he'd throw in the occasional British-ism. It wasn't that often and you could always figure it out in context. Holy shit, the Jones book has several per page that I have no idea what they mean. I've seen this element criticized but I think it's great, I loved reading all these turns of phrase that I'd never heard of and trying to figure out what they meant. Anglophiles will dig this.

The Washington Football Team book was great, by the way. I moved to DC in 1992, so I missed all of those glory years and it was great to get the details on them.

Also pinched out a book dedicated to Amy Winehouse's Back in Black. It was pretty boring and was basically just a 200 page love letter to the record. But it was interesting enough to finish as a toilet book.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 02, 2017, 10:43:06 pm
god I finally finished the Peter Hook autobiography on New Order....it really made me want to cry...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on April 03, 2017, 09:08:46 am
How so?
In the end, I liked it but damn it got to be a slog the last few hundred pages.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 03, 2017, 03:59:28 pm
How so?
In the end, I liked it but damn it got to be a slog the last few hundred pages.

cause i ended up really disliking Peter Hook and just to know how much he loathed the rest of the band... man I felt sad my favorite band ended up like that..

I lost a lot of respect for Peter Hook...if it was all so terrible he should have walked away from it decades ago! Also, why is he so obsessed with money.. every other page he is talking about how much he lost on this or that.. and how he's "skint"..its like, dude how the fuck can you be so poor? Don't you save anything? Even in the 2000s he's talking about doing stuff cause it gave him like 500 pounds and he needed the money! WTF??? He's such an asshole..so much of the stuff he talks about the rest of the band he really should not have... and then a lot of the stuff he says just seems like total bullshit or some he is making up maybe to use in the court trial (Does he really have to wail on Gillian so much?? I get it he hates Barney with a passion and yet stayed in the band for decades while hating him- talk about pathetic)

reading the book it just confirmed that since about 1985 Bernard Sumner has basically done way more than Peter Hook who has hardly lifted a finger..

Lovely by the way how Peter Hook calls himself the producer along with the engineer Michael Johnson......I have seen zero evidence of that anywhere..

The weird thing is that to me in person he's been a really nice guy but the book makes him look like a total asshole who has accomplished next to nothing during the past 30 plus years.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on April 03, 2017, 10:25:41 pm
makes him look like a total asshole who has accomplished next to nothing during the past 30 plus years.
my only wish in life is to not have this epitath

with that said, saw hooky twice in the last decade and those were some of the best shows I've seen durring that time
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 03, 2017, 11:57:26 pm
makes him look like a total asshole who has accomplished next to nothing during the past 30 plus years.
my only wish in life is to not have this epitath

with that said, saw hooky twice in the last decade and those were some of the best shows I've seen durring that time


well that is interesting to think about.. one's epitaph...

I'd lend you the book but I'd never get it back! :)

you might read it and have a different opinion but i doubt it...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on April 04, 2017, 09:00:56 am
well that is interesting to think about.. one's epitaph...
"This 9.27sq ft plot of Earth contains (insert Hutch's real name). Please don't pee here."
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on April 20, 2017, 09:49:49 pm
I found the 2001 Quincy Jones autobiography used.. he signed and dedicated it to "Shani".. I guess the book came out October 2001.. he dated it 10/20/01.. must have been the book tour as that is when it came out...

In some ways life did go on after 9-11 but it sure was a punch to the gut...

Quincy Jones for whatever reason seems to have worked with just about everyone I love from Billy Eckstine to Ray Charles, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra.. even New Order! Of course he engineered Michael Jackson's huge success putting together everything a lot of Off the Wall and Thriller...I am rather wary of the book but will read it and report back..I guess Shani did not think as highly of Q as I do..


I also picked up Murakami's 1Q84.. it looks positively ginourmous coming in at 925 pages.. good lord.. I have to say I am not optimistic about finishing it...I can't remember the last book of that length I read...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on August 07, 2017, 09:52:32 pm
Hutch...did you know about this one
Who Killed Mister Moonlight?

I did just enjoy this book
Sellout by Paul Beatty
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on August 07, 2017, 10:07:20 pm
The david j bauhaus focused autobiography?  Yah read it last year.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on August 08, 2017, 08:13:46 am
I did just enjoy this book
Sellout by Paul Beatty
Its rare a book make you laugh out loud repeatedly but that one did. Really enjoyed it.

This summer I've read:
Thomas Pynchon - Gravity's Rainbow : my second time through this one (last time was ten+ years ago). Holds up well.
Chuck Klosterman - X : good essay collection
Donna Tartt - The Little Friend : probably her weakest of her three novels but still pretty good.
Edif Batuman - The Idiot: I loved this book. A bravura work, and very funny.
Haruki Murakami - Sputnik Sweetheart: a run of the mill book by him. Not his best but not his worst.
Han King - The Vegetarian: very good, short novel. I think it was originally three short stories.

Currently reading: Adam Johnson's Orphan Master's Son. I hope to finish this and get through Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad before September when College Football starts up and all my productivity goes out the window.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: martinrob on August 29, 2017, 09:57:18 pm
Has anyone read the Johnny Marr autobiography Set the Boy Free?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on August 30, 2017, 12:57:55 pm
Really enjoyed Paul Auster's 4 3 2 1.  Four bildungsromans in one, as you're taken on four distinctly separate life journeys with the main character (Archie).  It reads like historical fiction, at times, especially when Archie encounters Mark Rudd and the campus unrest at Columbia University in 1968...  Somewhat verbose but very well done.

Emma Cline- the Girls is another good recent contemporary fiction choice. It deals with a Charlie Manson like cult and the main character's decision to hang with them or not.


Drew Magary's The Hike (2016).  He's a local Maryland writer.  This was a fun alternate reality type novel.  The protagonist begins a normal hike and winds up in a wacky fantasy world.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: vansmack on August 30, 2017, 01:32:59 pm
Has anyone read the Johnny Marr autobiography Set the Boy Free?

I have it on my Kindle, hoping to read it on vacation in Oct.

Is there a US release date for England is Mine?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: herman otto on September 08, 2017, 11:20:07 pm
I, never realized that Piers Anthony was a borderline, pedophile.   My childhood, is now ruined.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on September 14, 2017, 02:33:56 pm
Short list entries are out for the Man Booker Prize.   Loved the Auster book.  Anyone read the others?         http://themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booker-prize-announces-2017-shortlist                                                                                                   
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on September 15, 2017, 12:26:41 pm
Have not yet read Lincoln in the Bardo, but my husband did and said it's one of the best books he's read since The Road.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on September 15, 2017, 12:43:02 pm
Have not yet read Lincoln in the Bardo, but my husband did and said it's one of the best books he's read since The Road.
He's correct. Its excellent.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on October 05, 2017, 12:37:36 pm
Kazuo Ishiguro wins Nobel
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 11, 2017, 01:25:27 pm
Kazuo Ishiguro wins Nobel

I really loved Never Let Me Go.  Never got around to reading Remains of the Day.  I have a collection of his short stories on my bookshelf.  I'll have to jump into that.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 11, 2017, 01:54:06 pm
(https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1488832734l/34467031.jpg)

6.5/10

I wanted to like this book much more than I did.  Fairly or unfairly, Egan cannot escape the high expectations she set with Goon Squad.  It will forever be a foil to whatever else she pens and Manhattan Beach just doesn't measure up.  The book is a generally well written page turner that nicely captures the era (NYC before and during WWII) in which it is set.  The main characters are well-crafted and the protagonist is likeable and relatable, although I never felt a deep connection.  There are flashes of truly brilliant prose, but those shine because other times the writing really falls flat or feels like it was lifted from some Harlequin bodice-ripper.  Outside of the main characters, the others are underdeveloped.  But my biggest criticism is that whatever merits are earned by the writing, the story ends up sagging under the weight of its many contrivances.  Some plot developments are just too predictable and the unpredictable ones feel forced or far-fetched.  All that being said, if someone who had never read Goon Squad were to ask me if I've read any good historical novels lately, I could, in good conscience, recommend this one. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 11, 2017, 01:57:47 pm
Thank you for this review. LOVED goon squad. Perhaps will skip this one.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on October 11, 2017, 02:01:16 pm
Thank you for this review. LOVED goon squad. Perhaps will skip this one.

One tepid review from a random guy on an internet message board makes you want to skip a book?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Julian, Semi-Retired WUNDERKIND on October 11, 2017, 02:19:02 pm
I bought that but have to finish the new Eugindies first. Looking forward to it. Goon Squad is a hard bar to replicate.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on October 11, 2017, 02:50:28 pm
Thank you for this review. LOVED goon squad. Perhaps will skip this one.

One tepid review from a random guy on an internet message board makes you want to skip a book?

I have a bunch of books in my pile right now. Will wait to hear what some of my friends think before just buying it. Is that better?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on October 26, 2017, 10:46:38 am
Short list entries are out for the Man Booker Prize.   Loved the Auster book.  Anyone read the others?         http://themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booker-prize-announces-2017-shortlist                                                                                                 

Just finished Exit West.  I liked it a great deal - 8.5/10.  I am a fan of Hamid's writing style.  He's got this sort of sparse but elegant stream-of-consciousness thing going on.  Just like he did in the Reluctant Fundamentalist, he's able to take a really heavy topic and spin a very intimate, relatable yarn around it.  I think magical realism has become an overused device in recent years, but it works in this book.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on October 27, 2017, 10:41:37 am
Short list entries are out for the Man Booker Prize.   Loved the Auster book.  Anyone read the others?         http://themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booker-prize-announces-2017-shortlist                                                                                                 

Just finished Exit West.  I liked it a great deal - 8.5/10.  I am a fan of Hamid's writing style.  He's got this sort of sparse but elegant stream-of-consciousness thing going on.  Just like he did in the Reluctant Fundamentalist, he's able to take a really heavy topic and spin a very intimate, relatable yarn around it.  I think magical realism has become an overused device in recent years, but it works in this book.


Thanks, I'll check my local library for that one

Title: Re: Books
Post by: bearman🐻 on November 28, 2017, 06:28:48 pm
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41yQ20buxBL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Really powerful, I highly recommend this one. Patty's story isn't easy to digest, but it's about as compelling as they come. The Hit So Hard documentary was great, but this really details the grip and destructive nature of her addiction and how she managed to survive it. Major respect to her, not just for her drumming but for her courage.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Bagley on December 18, 2017, 01:32:34 pm
Short list entries are out for the Man Booker Prize.   Loved the Auster book.  Anyone read the others?         http://themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booker-prize-announces-2017-shortlist                                                                                                 

Just finished Exit West.  I liked it a great deal - 8.5/10.  I am a fan of Hamid's writing style.  He's got this sort of sparse but elegant stream-of-consciousness thing going on.  Just like he did in the Reluctant Fundamentalist, he's able to take a really heavy topic and spin a very intimate, relatable yarn around it.  I think magical realism has become an overused device in recent years, but it works in this book.


Thanks, I'll check my local library for that one


Thanks GGW-  Enjoyed Exit West, Reluctant Fundamentalist (how's the movie?) and Moth Smoke.

 Read Hari Kunzru's White Tears recently, also very good

Picked up the Sympathizer and ordered Sticky Fingers- the Jann Wenner thing
Title: Re: Books
Post by: lily1 on December 22, 2017, 12:24:22 am
I'm giving Sticky Fingers to my brother in law for Christmas.

And I just ordered Personal History and The Naughty Nineties for a friend. I loved the former, I learned so much that I didn't know about DC and the Post in the 70's, and I've been meaning to read the latter.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: hutch on December 22, 2017, 11:18:29 pm
Reading The Life of John Hay Volume 1 by William Roscoe Thayer first published 1915...this copy is from 1916
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ggw on February 05, 2018, 10:24:27 am
Short list entries are out for the Man Booker Prize.   Loved the Auster book.  Anyone read the others?         http://themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booker-prize-announces-2017-shortlist                                                                                                 

Finished History of Wolves over the weekend.  I would easily give it a 9.5/10; it's just so well written.  There are no gimmicks or clever literary devices - there is very little "action" at all (in the external world).  There is one big plot event, but it doesn't come until well into the second half of the book.  All the activity occurs in the thoughts, feelings, and growth of the main character and it is all beautifully rendered.  It's not so much a page-turner as it is the kind of book where I stopped to savor or reread passages, either because the metaphors were so brilliant or because the prose was simply stunning. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sidehatch ılılıll|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|̲̅̅=̲̅̅|̲̅̅●̲̅̅|llılılı on May 16, 2018, 08:27:11 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81fe1t3sX6L.jpg)
just into the first few chapters, but an engrossing read
any UDV church members on the board
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on May 16, 2018, 11:11:13 am
Michael Pollan in general annoys me. Is this as preachy and privileged as all of his food books?

Just finished The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer and loved it. Better than The Interestings. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Relaxer on June 23, 2018, 03:50:39 pm
I've had an incredible run of great books lately. here are a few I've enjoyed a lot recently

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51f5-dUobkL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51PlyI3OuSL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
a fictionalized account of medusa's life. its a self-published book so for that, it's pretty damn admirable. I like it but it's really depressing

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/510oxkENL-L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5179xYMahzL._AA300_.jpg)

(https://i.harperapps.com/covers/9780062798046/y450-300.jpg)

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Space Freely on June 26, 2018, 03:28:59 pm
music is my favorite thing.. so i go through periods where I read a lot of music bios but i have to say the industry has changed.. now they seem to be publishing a lot more of these books..its become a huge market (rock star memoirs)....

i think it has been said that most of them aren't that great...the worst one EVER is the Eric Crapton one... dude, he is one horrible man and I did not need to know that... of course i think he is the most overrated musician ever but his book is all about his drug use and alcoholism sobriety with a lot of stuff about how he screwed everybody over..

anthony kiedis' book is also a lot about his battle for sobriety but that one i liked.. i had no idea what an interesting childhood he had.. slash's was also interesting (his mom knew bowie really well!)...

i also liked to get the signed editions of course.. i have the bernard sumner and david j signed ones!

dean wareham's is also good...

Read this one a little while ago. I don't have much to add...it was a good read though I still don't like any of their music after Mother's Milk...I wonder if anyone has compared the number of times he mentioned shooting up vs. the number of times he got a blow job from a random girl? Probably too high to count.

I'm now reading Rocks Off: 50 Tracks That Tell the Story of the Rolling Stones...very well written book by Bill Janovitz, leader of Buffalo Tom.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: K8teebug on June 27, 2018, 10:32:36 am
Just bought Room to Dream!