Author Topic: Dropping Like Flies  (Read 987407 times)

Arthwys

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #60 on: April 02, 2005, 04:45:00 pm »
Pope is dead. RIP
Emrys

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #61 on: April 12, 2005, 03:30:00 pm »
Femminist & lousy lay, Andrea Dworkin.

Bags

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #62 on: April 12, 2005, 04:10:00 pm »
She was one intense broad, that Dworkin.  In the late 80s and early 90s I got pretty feminists to admire -- Naomi Wolff and Susan Faludi.
 
 "Men who want to support women in our struggle for freedom and justice should understand that it is not terrifically important to us that they learn to cry; it is important to us that they stop the crimes of violence against us."
 Dworkin, Andrea
 On Feminism
 
 "All personal, psychological, social, and institutionalized domination on this earth can be traced back to its source: the phallic identities of men."
 Dworkin, Andrea
 On Power
 
 "The common erotic project of destroying women makes it possible for men to unite into a brotherhood; this project is the only firm and trustworthy groundwork for cooperation among males and all male bonding is based on it."
 Dworkin, Andrea
 Human Fellowship
 
 "Marriage as an institution developed from rape as a practice. Rape, originally defined as abduction, became marriage by capture. Marriage meant the taking was to extend in time, to be not only use of but possession of, or ownership."
 Dworkin, Andrea
 On Marriage

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #63 on: April 12, 2005, 04:25:00 pm »
<img src="http://www.w3bdevil.com/forums/Rape-DidntKnow.jpg" alt=" - " />

ggw

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #64 on: April 15, 2005, 10:34:00 am »
Junior Delgado Dies
 
 JUNIOR DELGADO, A roots-reggae singer who enjoyed a purple patch during the 1970s, has died. Musicians close to Delgado said he passed away in London on Monday at the age of 49.
 
 The cause of death was not given.
 
 Delgado is best known for the dancehall hit Trickster, which introduced him to the mainstream in the mid 1970s. Later that decade, he had Top 20 hits in Merry Go Round and Fort Augusta which were produced by Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare.
 
 He also wrote songs for his good friend, Dennis Brown, Jacob Miller and Althea and Donna.
 
 Saxophonist Dean Fraser, who played on Merry Go Round, remembered Delgado as a "hardcore protest singer". Added Fraser: "He never had many big hits in Jamaica but he always had a good following in England."
 
 Delgado was born Oscar Delgado Hibbert at Luke Lane in downtown Kingston. In a 1994 interview with The Gleaner, he said his first recording was the song Reaction which came in 1970 for producer Joe Gibbs.
 
 He continued to record for Gibbs as a solo act and with the harmony group, Time Unlimited, releasing several grassroots hits like African Sound and 23rd Psalms.
 
 But, his first major hit came alongside the teenaged Brown with whom he struck up a solid partnership in the mid 1970s, recording a cover of The Heptones' Party Time, which was done for Brown's DEB label.
 
 Trickster was Delgado's biggest hit song as a solo artiste for DEB, which was followed by Tition, a critique of corrupt politicians.
 
 In the late 1970s, Delgado hooked up with Dunbar and Shakespeare, then the hottest production team in reggae with their revamped Taxi label. Merry Go Round and Fort Augusta remain two of Delgado's biggest hits.
 
 Delgado lived in England for much of the last 20 years, touring Europe and working as a producer. Among the acts he produced for his Incredible Music label were singers Michael Rose, Frankie Paul and Yami Bolo.

Bombay Chutney

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #65 on: April 15, 2005, 12:42:00 pm »
Rock and blues pianist Johnnie Johnson dies
 
 (AP) -- Johnnie Johnson, a rock 'n' roll pioneer who teamed with Chuck Berry for hits like Roll Over Beethoven and No Particular Place to Go, died Wednesday. He was 80.
 
 Johnson died at his St. Louis home. The cause of death was not immediately known, said publicist Margo Lewis. He had been hospitalized a month ago with pneumonia and was on dialysis for a kidney ailment, said John May, a friend and fellow musician.
 
 Though he was never a household name, Johnson and Berry's long collaboration helped define early rock 'n' roll. Johnson often composed the music on piano, then Berry converted it to guitar and wrote the lyrics. In fact, Berry's Johnny B. Goode was a tribute to Johnson.
 
 After he and Berry parted ways, Johnson performed with Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, John Lee Hooker and Bo Diddley, among others. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 in the ''sidemen'' category.
 
 ''He left the indelible imprint of his sound,'' May said. ``He was able to transition through any musical style because he just loved to play music.''
 
 Johnson was born in Fairmont, W.Va., and began playing piano at 4. He moved to Chicago after World War II, where he played jazz and blues in clubs. He moved to St. Louis in the early 1950s, forming his own R&B band, the Johnnie Johnson Trio.
 
 Johnson is survived by his wife and children.

Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #66 on: April 15, 2005, 12:51:00 pm »
Jerry Byrd
 
 Jerry Byrd is probably cited by more steel players as the single most influential player in their early musical development than any other musician. He almost singlehandedly defined the steel sound of early Nashville and created an extremely personal style whose trademark vibrato and lush tunings became the most-imitated way to play Hawaiian music.
 
 Jerry Byrd was born March 9, 1920 in Lima, Ohio. His country and western steel guitar playing can be heard in his work with such artists as Chet Atkins, Jethro Burns, Marty Robbins, Hank Snow, Roy Clark, Ernest Tubb, Red Foley, Burl Ives and numerous others. His work with Hank Williams was done on a Rickenbacker BD-6 lap steel tuned to C6 tuning. This guitar is now in the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tennessee.
 
 Byrd has been a lifelong exponent of traditional Hawaiian music. In the 1960's, he grew weary of the super-hyped, pressure cooker world of commercial country music. Byrd moved to Honolulu in the early 1970's and has become a revered and much honored presence for his efforts at teaching native Hawaiian youths about steel guitar - ironically, their own instrument! He is a consummate master of all the basic Hawaiian tunings such as C6th (his signature tuning) B11th, E13th, C#m9, F#m9, and several more. He has composed several tunes that have become steel guitar standards including "Steelin' the Blues" and "Steelin' the Chimes".
 
 His 1950's records can be found in used vinyl stores, on eBay, or on cassette from Tom Bradshaw.
 
 There are a couple of Jerry Byrd CDs available. By far the best one currently available is Steel Guitar Hawaiian Style, Lehua SLC-7023. It includes lush Hawaiian standards such as "Pau'au'au Waltz" and "Sand"(350K .AU) as well as uptempo march tunes. It's available from Scotty's Music,314-427-7794 or Tower Records,1-800-ASK-TOWER.

ggw

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #67 on: April 15, 2005, 01:08:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Charlie Nakatestes, Japanese Golfer:
  Jerry Byrd
 
Did he die?
 
 Or is that post just for informational purposes?

Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #68 on: April 15, 2005, 01:12:00 pm »
He died, though I couldn't find any news sources confirming this....though it is mentioned on his fan club website.
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by ggw?:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Charlie Nakatestes, Japanese Golfer:
  Jerry Byrd
 
Did he die?
 
 Or is that post just for informational purposes? [/b]

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #69 on: April 30, 2005, 09:23:00 am »
Psychobilly pioneer & one man band, Hasil Adkins.

RonniStar

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #70 on: April 30, 2005, 05:55:00 pm »
Guitarist Bryan Ottoson of American Head Charge, the Twin Cities' best-known metal band, was found dead in a tour bus Tuesday in North Charleston, S.C.
 
 A band spokeswoman said Ottoson, 27, died in his bunk between stops on the group's tour with Mudvayne. The cause of death was uncertain, pending an autopsy.
 
 MTV News quoted a North Charleston police source that said Ottoson was found with a bottle of prescription drugs and that he had consumed a lot of alcohol the previous night. The band's publicist could not confirm or deny that.
 
 American Head Charge's latest CD, "The Feeding," came out in March and made it to No. 15 on Billboard's Independent Albums chart.
 
 In an interview before the album's release, Ottoson talked about how the band struggled with drug addiction and other personal demons after the disappointing sales of its 2001 CD, "The War of Art," which it made with renowned rock producer Rick Rubin.
 bryan ottoson
 Bryan Ottoson
 Charles Hall
 Special to the Star Tribune
 
 "We hit rock bottom in every way," Ottoson said.
 
 American Head Charge rose to the top of the local metal scene in the late-1990s with wild, nearly violent stage shows and a hard-hitting industrial sound. By 2001, the band had earned a coveted slot on the Ozzfest tour and a record deal with Rubin's American Recordings.
 
 Ottoson joined the band after the recording of "The War of Art." He came to the group after stints in Black Flood Diesel and A-Pod, two other popular local rock bands.
 
 The other members of American Head Charge were flying back to the Twin Cities from Atlanta and were unavailable for comment Wednesday.
 
 The group's tour with Mudvayne was enjoying strong ticket sales, helped by the fact that Mudvayne's new CD debuted at No. 1 in the nation this week. Mudvayne canceled its show Tuesday but is expected to continue touring.
 
 Ottoson's death hit hard at local rock station 93X (93.7 FM), which frequently played Head Charge's songs. Its staff plans to have a giant memorial card for fans to sign at this week's Audioslave and Slipknot concerts.
 
 "Everyone here at 93X considered Bryan a very good friend, and we all cheered when he officially joined the band," said marketing director Wendy Ellis. "We would like to extend our deepest sympathies to his mother, American Head Charge and the fans. This is a tragic loss."
 
 Sage Robinson, publicist for the band's record label, DRT/Nitrus, said, "We all thought of Bryan as a wonderful guy, a real sweetheart and a great musician. So there's definitely a terrible sadness."
 
  Here's A link and  Another link

SPARX

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #71 on: May 02, 2005, 03:32:00 pm »
Rock-a-billy artist Hasil Adkins, a one-man band whose screaming vocals and freestyle approach to rhythm landed a cult following, has died at 67.
 
 Adkins' body was found Tuesday at his Madison home, where he lived alone. The cause of death has not been determined but it does not appear to be suspicious. The body has been sent to the state medical examiner's office, Boone County Sheriff's Deputy J.M. Thompson said Wednesday.
 
 "Someone had gone to check on him and had found him," Thompson said.
 
 Guitar. Harmonica. Drums. Foot-rhythm instruments. Adkins played them all - often while singing. A yodel, screaming and a high-pitched female's lark were some of his many voices.
 
 The son of a coal miner, Adkins learned to played guitar before he was 10. He claimed the only time he practiced his songs was on stage.
 
 Known to his fans as The Haze, Adkins struggled for decades to get noticed. In a 2002 interview, he said he mailed out thousands of tapes and records over a 30-year period while fishing for a record deal.
 
 Even Richard Nixon got one, courtesy of U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va. The president's reply to Adkins came on White House stationery in 1970: "I am very pleased by your thoughtfulness in bringing these particular selections to my attention."
 
 "Hasil was one of a handful of artists I think (who) are truly unique and truly individual. There aren't very many people whose music you can identify in seconds. But he was one of them," said Michael Lipton, a Charleston musician and writer who wrote stories about Adkins for newspapers and magazines and later became friends with Adkins.
 
 "And like those kinds of singular artists, they have good nights and bad nights, on a good night it was the most rhythmic, primal music I think I've ever heard," Lipton said Wednesday.
 
 "On a bad night, it was still good."
 
 Adkins was the original star of Norton Records, a label built around the primal recordings Adkins produced in his mountain home, beginning in the Eisenhower era.
 
 "People told me they wondered how I could stick with it, so many heartaches and letdowns. I had 'em by the hundreds, millions I guess," Adkins said. "I said, well, I didn't start to quit."
 
 Adkins, who claimed to have written more than 7,000 songs, first emerged hooting and wailing in the 1950s, only to disappear again. European fans kept the rock-a-billy rage alive, and when the Cramps did an early 1980s remake of Adkins' "She Said," his records suddenly became hot again.
 
 What Adkins sang about was just as unique as his delivery, which was fueled by a 2-gallon-a-day coffee habit.
 
 New York-based Norton Records combined new and previous recordings to release "Poultry in Motion," a collection of 15 Adkins songs about chicken from 1955 to 1999.
 
 His "Chicken Walk" and "The Hunch" became two short-lived dance fads.
 
 There also were tunes like "Chocolate Milk Honeymoon" and "Boo Boo The
 Cat."
 
 Despite his antics, acquaintances described Adkins as good hearted.
 
 "He'd do anything for you, sing any song for you if he knew it," said Juanita Pridemore of Washington Heights.
 
 Adkins often performed at Charleston's Empty Glass bar, where some out-of-town acts stipulated that he open for them.
 
 "It was just amazing. It was like nothing you've ever heard," said Leslie Nahodil, a Boone County nurse who met Adkins during his occasional visits to her hospital's emergency room. "It was just pure,
 homespun, country rock-a-billy music." (AP)

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #72 on: May 02, 2005, 06:19:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by SPARX:
  Rock-a-billy artist Hasil Adkins, a one-man band has died at 67.
<img src="http://www.w3bdevil.com/forums/Old-BTF.jpg" alt=" - " />

SPARX

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #73 on: May 02, 2005, 07:46:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Ginger Vitus:
   
Quote
Originally posted by SPARX:
  Rock-a-billy artist Hasil Adkins, a one-man band has died at 67.
<img src="http://www.w3bdevil.com/forums/Old-BTF.jpg" alt=" - " /> [/b]
One of a kind that Hasil.Only reason he was a one man band was coz he thought when he heard Johnny or Jerry Lee on the radio and was told that was Johnny Cash or whomever,he actually thought they were playing everything,so he learned to do it all:  http://www.deuceofclubs.com/write/adkins.htm                                                                                                                         RIP Hasil!

Jaguär

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Re: Dropping Like Flies
« Reply #74 on: May 05, 2005, 07:12:00 pm »
A salute to Hack.