Author Topic: CFP  (Read 6150 times)

Justin Tonation

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CFP
« on: December 19, 2011, 10:59:56 am »
Call For Papers - Boston University Graduate Musicology Conference - Saturday, February 18, 2012

Music and Violence: Conflict, Resistance and Reconciliation
9 A.M. - 4 P.M., Faculty Dining Room, George Sherman Union

Keynote Speaker: Ellen Koskoff

The Boston University Music Society welcomes Professor Ellen Koskoff (Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester) as the keynote speaker for the fifth annual Boston University Graduate Musicology Conference on February 18, 2012, titled "Music and Violence: Conflict, Resistance, and Reconciliation." Music and violence, linked since antiquity in ritual, myth, and art, express seemingly disparate but closely entwined aspects of the human psyche. Considered together they raise fundamental questions about creativity, discourse, and music?s role in society.

The Society seeks paper submissions from graduate students that explore relationships between music and violence and the role of music in conflict, mediation, resistance, and reconciliation. Graduate students at all stages of their studies, working in any area or discipline, are encouraged to submit their work.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following: music and torture, music as protest, music in social movements, music as an oppressive force, dj battles, and music as an agent of change.

The Boston University Graduate Musicology Conference is sponsored by the Department of Musicology & Ethnomusicology and the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION:

Abstracts are due by midnight on Friday, DECEMBER 30, 2011. (new Deadline)

Abstracts must be no longer than 250 words and submitted by e-mail to Vice President Kate Stringer, katestringer237 at gmail.com with ?Conference Abstract? in the subject title. Please submit abstracts as Word document attachments or as text in the body of the email. Accepted presenters will be notified by e-mail of their status by January 7, 2011 (new date)

FORMAT INFORMATION:

Papers will be twenty minutes in length. Two session chairs (respondents) will respond to the papers and moderate a brief question and answer period. The conference will also feature a round table discussion, as well as a reception following the close of the conference.
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sweetcell

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Re: CFP
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2011, 12:35:40 pm »
i'm down with CFP.
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Brian_Wallace

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Re: CFP
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2011, 01:25:34 pm »
Call For Papers - Boston University Graduate Musicology Conference - Saturday, February 18, 2012

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following: music and torture, music as protest, music in social movements, music as an oppressive force, dj battles, and music as an agent of change.

Does "Bruce Springsteen makes me want to punch someone" qualify?

Brian

Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2011, 01:43:36 pm »
Call for Papers: "Popular Music and Protest"

The SMT Popular Music Interest Group, the Popular Music Section of the SEM, and the AMS Popular Music Study Group announce a joint call for papers in anticipation of the combined SMT/SEM/AMS meeting in New Orleans, Nov. 1-4, 2012. The proposed interdisciplinary session will feature scholars from each of the three fields. The topic is Popular Music and Protest, which this session seeks to explore from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Throughout the world's history, popular music has been used as a form of political resistance, from anticolonial uprisings, struggles for civil rights, and anti-war movements to current political upheavals in the United States and the Middle East. Musicians including Woody Guthrie, Marvin Gaye, Bob Marley, U2, Rage Against the Machine, Mercedes Sosa, Public Enemy, and Cui Jian have featured prominently in the history of protest, and song in particular has been a medium through which social groups can express opposition and solidarity.

Scholars are encouraged to submit a 250-word proposal for a 20-minute talk that will be followed by ten minutes of discussion. Successful proposals will use structural, historical, social, ethnographic, or analytical perspectives to address intersections of popular music and protest. Proposals should not include information identifying the author, although submissions should separately indicate 1) the home society of the author; and 2) what equipment is needed for the paper. Proposals will be considered for inclusion on the joint special session by a subcommittee comprising members of the respective popular music groups from SMT, SEM, and AMS.  Once assembled, this session will then be submitted as a joint session proposal to the program committees for the New Orleans conference.

Please email submissions to alexreed ->ufl.edu by the end of Friday, January 6, 2012. Authors will be notified of acceptance one week after this date, so as to allow for denied papers to be submitted individually to the conference, should the authors choose to do so.
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2011, 12:55:13 pm »
A more interesting call for the conference above:


CFP: Music, Sound, and Protest in the Twenty-First Century

AMS/SEM/SMT New Orleans, November 2012

We invite short proposals from all branches of music studies for an alternative-format discussion panel at the 2012 AMS/SEM/SMT meeting in New Orleans on the topic of music, sound, and protest in the twenty-first century.

We are specifically interested in proposals that consider the role of music and sound in the wave of protest movements that has gained momentum since 2010: the ongoing protests in the Arab World; labor protests in Madison, WI; the Occupy movement; protests against austerity measures in Europe and elsewhere; demonstrations disputing the results of recent parliamentary elections in Russia; and the uprising currently unfolding in Wukan and elsewhere in China. Musical and sonic practices relevant to the discussion include (but are not limited to) the collective performance of protest songs; crowd chants; drum circles; the human microphone; the use of sound cannons for crowd control; live performances by professional musicians; and the participation of activist street bands in protest. Among the theoretical issues to be considered are: the use of music and sound as emotional and affective components of political experience; the role of sound in the formation, cohesion and maintenance of crowds; the politics of volume and amplification; the violence of sound; the link between music and hope; negotiations of translation, religion, and cultural difference; the articulation of social, cultural, and class identities through sound; and the role of sonic media in both propagating and framing protest actions to the public.

Proposals should be around 200 words. Please email them to edrott ->sbcglobal.net by January 10, 2012.

Eric Drott, Associate Professor of Music Theory
University of Texas at Austin

Michael Gallope, Collegiate Assistant Professor of the Humanities
University of Chicago
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2012, 10:33:20 pm »
Bloomsbury is thrilled to announce a call for new proposals for the acclaimed 33 1/3 book series, previously published by Continuum. (Bloomsbury acquired Continuum in July 2011).

The series - each volume of which focuses on one popular music album of the last several decades - started in September 2003 and has so far published 85 titles. Books in the series so far have taken a wide range of approaches, on subjects ranging from albums by the Kinks to James Brown, from Bob Dylan to Prince, from the Pixies to Public Enemy, and from the Beastie Boys to Celine Dion.

In these new proposals, we'll be looking for original research, for stories in the history of popular music (recent or otherwise) that haven't been told too often (if at all), and for perspectives that will broaden and develop the discipline of writing about music, as read by a global readership of music scholars and fans.

Proposals will be considered for books about any album that hasn't already been covered in the series, or isn't already under contract. (The Wikipedia page on the series can help with this.) Your choice of album is precisely that: yours. Titles in the series typically sell 4-5,000 copies or more: if you're convinced that enough readers around the world would rush out to buy your book, then go ahead and persuade us!

All resulting books published in the series as a result of this call for proposals will be published under the Bloomsbury Academic imprint during 2013 and 2014. (All existing titles in the series will also be re-branded as Bloomsbury Academic titles, in due course.)

http://www.33third.blogspot.com/2012/01/call-for-proposals-for-33-13-series.html
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2012, 03:07:07 pm »
CFP (articles): This is the Sound of Irony: Music, Politics and the Public Sphere


Irony is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "a figure of speech in which the intended meaning is the opposite of that expressed by the words used." Music challenges this construction through the unique properties of its semantic indeterminacy, performance practices and re-appropriation for new ends. Irony in music is perhaps nowhere more effective than that which is/was employed in the public sphere as a means of destabilizing power or interjecting dissent. Based on papers read at the recent conference ?The Art and Politics of Irony,? this edited collection for an academic press seeks additional essays that address irony in music or musical culture used for political effect or public impact.  Both popular and art music topics that address these themes are welcome. Essays should have a foundation in the current broad field of irony studies ? literary, political, humor, performance studies, musical, etc. Completed essays of 5000-6000 words (including notes) will be due
 mid-
fall.

For consideration, please send a proposal of 400-500 words describing the topic and relevant irony theory/methodology and a short bio paragraph including contact information by June 15, 2012 to K_L_Turner [at] yahoo.com. Please feel free to contact me with questions. Katherine L. Turner.
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2012, 03:09:15 pm »
Call For Articles
The Future(s) of Music? ? Notions of Prospective Musics in Utopian
Movies and Literature

The famous Cantina Band scene from George Lucas? Star Wars, featuring
an alien ensemble performing a foxtrott-like John Williams
composition, is just one of many examples: While film scores often
have provided an experimental ground for musical innovators ? just
think of the trendsetting sound creations Oskar Sala and Bernard
Herrmann contributed to the late films by Alfred Hitchcock ? diegetic
depictions of musical performances, i.e. those scenes in films where
the production or consumption of music is part of the story, often
draw on known musical idioms when the dramatic setting is explicitly
utopian. The paradox here is that there seems to be a decisive
difference between composing innovative film scores on the one hand
and imagining, picturing and sounding-out ?the music of the future? on
the other. Or, is it futures?

Now that Holly- has been joined by Bolly-, Hallyu-, Nolly-, and
several other -woods from all around the globe, the Norient Academic
Online Journal (NAOJ) is looking for articles for its second volume
that address cinematic, theatrical / dramatic and / or literary
delineations of the future(s) of music and that pay particular
consideration to the specific positions, perspectives and artistic
strategies of its producers. NAOJ is looking for contributions that
reflect on the diversity of worldviews, on ?aural imaginations? of
places, discuss markers of knowledge and power, or explore traces of
ethnocentrism, traditionalism, or parody in these various produced and
performed futures.

We also welcome ethnographic articles on popular musics from around the world.

Deadline for abstracts (maximum 200 words) is May 31st, 2012 and
should be submitted to
journal_submission at norient.com

For further information:
http://norient.com/academic/vol2/
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2012, 03:12:46 pm »
CFP (journal articles): Journal of Sonic Studies, special issue: Rethinking Theories of Television Sound

Call for Papers

Special Issue: Rethinking Theories of Television Sound (Deadline: May 31, 2012)

http://www.sonicstudies.org

Essays are invited for a special issue of the Journal of Sonic Studies that will reexamine the most persistent accounts of television sound, from the 1980s to the present, and reflect on these accounts in terms of contemporary changes in the production and consumption of television. Studies on television sound typically begin by emphasizing that the fundamental differences between film and television≠differences in terms of structure, content, and modes of address≠are a direct result of the fact that film privileges the eye over the ear, while television privileges the ear over the eye. This notion of television as a form of ?illustrated radio? became the basis of television sound studies, but the rise of high-definition television, widescreen receivers, and home entertainment systems challenged this notion by bringing the cinematic experience into the home. Following these technological developments, critics began to apply theories of film sound to the study of television by
 focu
sing on the design of ?underscores? to convey emotional states and enhance narrative tension.

In recent years, television has undergone yet another major shift as the concept of ?home cinema? has been accompanied by radical changes in the way television is broadcast and received. With the rise of ambient television, portable devices, social media and web interfaces, television is now viewed in a much wider range of locations and contexts, which complicates these earlier approaches to the study of television sound. Viewers are increasingly watching television in public spaces, they are increasingly using portable devices that transmit sound over low-quality speakers or headphones, and they are increasingly using new media platforms that alter the context in which television is viewed by time-shifting, eliminating advertising, and isolating programs from broadcast flow, which de-emphasizes televisual ?liveness.? Portability, transferability, and access have thus become more important than the reproduction of a cinematic experience, which problematizes both the ?illustra
 ted r
adio? and ?home cinema? models of television sound.

These contemporary changes demand that scholars once again reexamine and reevaluate the function of sound in the production, transmission, and reception of television programming, and we therefore invite proposals that examine the range of approaches used in sound recording and design in the contemporary ?post-television? era. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Are established theories of sound-image relations and television ?orality? still relevant?
- Are there ways of conceiving of television sound as more than simply the operation of soundtracks and music?
- What role does sound play in the spatial and temporal organization of televisual texts?
- Does television sound still play an interpellative role following the disappearance of traditional sound cues, such as applause and laugh tracks?
- What are the sound practices employed in the production of television ?webisodes,? which are intended to be viewed on alternate media platforms?
- What is the impact of new economic models (i.e. subscription and pay-per-view) on the production and reception of television sound?

Potential contributors are invited to submit completed essays by May 31, 2012. Submissions should be 5500-6000 words in length and they should be submitted as an attachment in .doc format. For more information, or to submit an essay, please contact our guest editors:

Carolyn Birdsall, University of Amsterdam: C.J.Birdsall at uva.nl
Anthony Enns, Dalhousie University: Anthony.Enns at dal.ca

The Journal of Sonic Studies (JSS) is a peer-reviewed, online, open access journal providing a platform for theorists and artists who would like to present relevant work regarding auditory cultures, to further our collective understanding of the impact and importance of sound for our cultures. The editors welcome both scholarly and artistic research. In both cases, priority is given to contributions that explicitly use the Internet as a medium, e.g. by inserting A/V materials, hyperlinks, and the use of non-conventional structures. The editors also expect all contributions to have a firm theoretical grounding. Submission guidelines can be found at sonicstudies.org/guidelines.
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Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2013, 10:04:50 pm »
This is a good one to resurrect this thread:


Call for Chapter Contributions
Developing Pedagogies of Punk

Developing curriculums and pedagogical approaches to the teaching of Punk music is a poorly investigated area within Music in Higher Education. The growing capability for institutions to develop programmes in these popular music areas have led to an appropriation of traditional teaching methods in some areas and innovative groundbreaking processes in others. The aim of this edited volume is to capture the contemporary thinking and doing of teaching practitioners around the world exploring their practice as punk pedagogues.

This volume intends to be reflective of and responsive to the plurality of pedagogies involved in the teaching of Punk and associated musics. We would welcome contributions that pose critical questions that may include:

?       What strategies are employed in developing programmes that include Punk as curriculum content?
?       What new approaches to understanding the teaching of music can we garner from the teaching of Punk?
?       What tensions are there in the placing of Punk within a Higher Education context?
?       What sorts of identities (and alternative identities) are engaged with through the teaching of Punk?
?       What is the influence does Punk have on developing more generalised Music programmes?
?       How do Programmes of containing Punk fulfil or question contemporary enhancement themes of Equality and Diversity, Internationalising the Curriculum or Employability?

Proposals, which should be no longer than 500 words, should be forwarded by email to: Louise Jackson, l.jackson at trinitylaban.ac.uk and Dr. Mike Dines, miked71uk at yahoo.co.uk on or before January 6th 2014.

For further information please refer to: http://chi.academia.edu/MikeDines
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RatBastard

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Re: CFP
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2013, 01:09:16 pm »
LOL what a fucking joke.  And this guy is in a teaching position!
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sweetcell

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Re: CFP
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2013, 03:26:49 pm »
LOL what a fucking joke.  And this guy is in a teaching position!

why is this a joke?  punk was a social movement, among other things... are you saying it's not worthy of study?  or are you disagreeing with some other aspect of this call for submissions?
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i am gay and i like cats

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Re: CFP
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2013, 04:18:18 pm »
brians comment . . . was fucking priceless.  thank you, brian

Ardamus

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Re: CFP
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2013, 11:00:16 pm »
Soooooo, you get paid for getting your essays published? Or you get some nerdy groupie broads to suck you off? There's a prize in all of these contests posted aside from bragging about being published I'm thinking.

Justin Tonation

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Re: CFP
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2013, 08:59:25 am »
Soooooo, you get paid for getting your essays published? Or you get some nerdy groupie broads to suck you off? There's a prize in all of these contests posted aside from bragging about being published I'm thinking.

Tenure
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