Author Topic: Vinyl isn't dead yet...  (Read 56390 times)

jm1

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2008, 12:26:00 pm »
Just confirmed -- Orpheus indeed closes 4/1. All used LP's are 30% off as are most sealed LP's...

jm1

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2008, 09:04:00 pm »
More on the Orpheus closing:
 
 http://vinyldistrict.blogspot.com/

organizedconfusion

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2008, 10:36:00 pm »
rare vynil will be expensive. Any errors on the label can make it more expensive.  Try typing in 'rare funk 45's' in any search engine.  As far as funk: the more you have never heard of it, the more expensive it probably is. An original of James Brown "live at the apollo" goes for a healthy amount of money and most record stores will tell you its a hot item. As it should be I think.  
 
 That sound though. WOW.
 
 I hate having this library of vynil, and have to be sitting at home copying it all over to my mac. "I WANT MY LIFE BACK"

sweetcell

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2008, 10:50:00 pm »
if vinyl is a superior medium for audio reproduction, why are all its suppliers and resellers going out of business?
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nkotb

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2008, 10:53:00 pm »
To a vast majority of music buyers, convenience > sound quality I'd be willing to bet.
 
 I'd absolutely love walls full of vinyl, but as a CD can fit unseen above my car's visor and is easily slipped into my in-dash CD player.  Add onto the extra super duper ease of MP3s and you've got yourself a specialty market.  
 
 To be honest, I'm surprised there are any record stores left, considering the way CD shops are going out of business.
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by sweetcell:
  if vinyl is a superior medium for audio reproduction, why are all its suppliers and resellers going out of business?

azaghal1981

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2008, 10:59:00 pm »
Another recently published article on this topic:
 
 Vinyl May Be Final Nail in CD's Coffin
 By Eliot Van Buskirk
 10.29.07 | 12:00 AM
 
 As counterintuitive as it may seem in this age of iPods and digital downloads, vinyl -- the favorite physical format of indie music collectors and audiophiles
 -- is poised to re-enter the mainstream, or at least become a major tributary.
 
 Talk to almost anyone in the music business' vital indie and DJ scenes and you'll encounter a uniformly optimistic picture of the vinyl market.
 
 "I'm hearing from labels and distributors that vinyl is way up," said Ian Connelly, client relations manager of independent distributor alliance IODA, in
 an e-mail interview. "And not just the boutique, limited-edition colored vinyl that
 Jesu/
 Isis-
 style fans are hot for right now."
 
 Pressing plants are ramping up production, but where is the demand coming from? Why do so many people still love vinyl, even though its bulky, analog nature
 is anathema to everything music is supposed to be these days? Records, the vinyl evangelists will tell you, provide more of a connection between fans and
 artists. And many of today's music fans buy 180-gram vinyl LPs for home listening and MP3s for their portable devices.
 
 "For many of us, and certainly for many of our artists, the vinyl is the true version of the release," said Matador's Patrick Amory. "The size and presence
 of the artwork, the division into sides, the better sound quality, above all the involvement and work the listener has to put in, all make it the format
 of choice for people who really care about music."
 
 Because these music fans also listen using portable players and computers, Matador and other labels include coupons in record packaging that can be used
 to download MP3 versions of the songs. Amory called the coupon program "hugely popular."
 
 Portability is no longer any reason to stick with CDs, and neither is audio quality. Although
 vinyl purists are ripe for parody,
 they're right about one thing: Records can sound better than CDs.
 
 Although CDs have a wider dynamic range, mastering houses are often encouraged to compress the audio on CDs to make it as loud as possible: It's the so-called
 loudness war.
 Since the audio on vinyl can't be compressed to such extremes, records generally offer a more nuanced sound.
 
 Another reason for vinyl's sonic superiority is that no matter how high a sampling rate is, it can never contain all of the data present in an analog groove,
 Nyquist's theorem
 to the contrary.
 
 "The digital world will never get there," said Chris Ashworth, owner of United Record Pressing, the country's largest record pressing plant.
 
 Golden-eared audiophiles have long testified to vinyl's warmer, richer sound. And now demand for vinyl is on the rise. Pressing plants that were already
 at capacity are staying there, while others are cranking out more records than they did last year in order to keep pace with demand.
 
 Don MacInnis, owner of Record Technology in Camarillo, California, predicts production will be up 25 percent over last year by the end of 2007. And he's
 not talking about small runs of dance music for DJs, but the whole gamut of music: "new albums, reissues, majors and indies ... jazz, blues, classical,
 pop and a lot of (classic) rock."
 
 Turntables are hot again as well.
 Insound,
 an online music retailer that recently began selling USB turntables alongside vinyl, can't keep them in stock, according to the company's director, Patrick
 McNamara.
 
 And on Oct. 17, Amazon.com launched a
 vinyl-only section
 stocked with a growing collection of titles and several models of record players.
 
 Big labels still aren't buying the vinyl comeback, but it wouldn't be the first time the industry failed to identify a new trend in the music biz.
 
 "Our numbers, at least, don't really point to a resurgence," said Jonathan Lamy, the Recording Industry Association of America's director of communications.
 Likewise, Nielsen SoundScan, which registered a slight increase in vinyl sales last year, nonetheless showed a 43 percent decrease between 2000 and 2006.
 
 But when it comes to vinyl, these organizations don't really know what they're talking about. The RIAA's numbers are misleading because its member labels
 are only now beginning to react to the growing demand for vinyl. As for SoundScan, its numbers don't include many of the small indie and dance shops where
 records are sold. More importantly, neither organization tracks used records sold at stores or on eBay -- arguably the central clearinghouse for vinyl
 worldwide.
 
 Vinyl's popularity has been underreported before.
 
 "The Consumer Electronics Association said that only 100,000 turntables were sold in 2004. Numark alone sold more than that to pro DJs that year," said
 Chris Roman, product manager for Numark.
 
 And the vinyl-MP3 tag team might just hasten the
 long-predicted death of the CD.
 
 San Francisco indie band
 The Society of Rockets,
 for example, plans to release its next album strictly on vinyl and as MP3 files.
 
 "Having just gone through the process of mastering our new album for digital and for vinyl, I can say it is completely amazing how different they really
 sound," said lead singer and guitarist Joshua Babcock in an e-mail interview. "The way the vinyl is so much better and warmer and more interesting to listen
 to is a wonder."
 
 http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/commentary/listeningpost/2007/10/listeningpost_1029
احمد

Bombay Chutney

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2008, 09:53:00 am »
Quote
Originally posted by azaghal1981:
 
 As counterintuitive as it may seem in this age of iPods and digital downloads, vinyl -- the favorite physical format of indie music collectors and audiophiles
 -- is poised to re-enter the mainstream, or at least become a major tributary.
 
Vinyl may be more popular recently, but this is a bit much.  I read somewhere (Coolfer maybe?) that vinyl accounts for a miniscule perentage of music sales.  Like a fraction of a percent.   That's a far cry from "major tributary".
 
 
Quote
Because these music fans also listen using portable players and computers, Matador and other labels include coupons in record packaging that can be used
 to download MP3 versions of the songs.
[/b]
 
 They really need to push this more.  I wasn't even aware of this until it was brought up on this board recently.  Portability is the only reason why I don't buy many LPs.  I'd pay a couple bucks more for a vinyl+mp3 package.

Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2008, 10:18:00 am »
Vinyl isn't dead yet, but Heath Ledger is. Who would have guessed that?

jm1

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2008, 10:58:00 am »
That's THE key -- if more record labels begin to offer the entire LP as a free Mp3 download bundled into the price (ala Merge) sales would flourish -- which would keep both my turntable and iPod quite happy. (What's a CD?)

beetsnotbeats

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2008, 03:07:00 pm »
I just received Georgie James' CD and the Robyn Hitchcock CD box "I Wanna Go Backwards." The Georgie James disc contains MP3s of other Saddle Creek artists. The Hitchcock box contains a coupon for additional Yep Roc downloads.

Julian, Alleged Computer F**kface

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2008, 03:08:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Charlie Nakatestes,Japanese Golfer:
  Vinyl isn't dead yet, but Heath Ledger is. Who would have guessed that?
Too soon, man, too soon. My sister is still beside herself.

azaghal1981

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2008, 03:38:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Julian, good manners AFICIONADO:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Charlie Nakatestes,Japanese Golfer:
  Vinyl isn't dead yet, but Heath Ledger is. Who would have guessed that?
Too soon, man, too soon. My sister is still beside herself. [/b]
You busted on Casey Calvert's shitty band sooner (not that it wasn't justified).  ;)
احمد

anarchist

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2008, 03:38:00 pm »
vinyl will be dead when orpheus closes and the owner has to get a real job.

Julian, Alleged Computer F**kface

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Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2008, 03:40:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by azaghal1981:
  You busted on Casey Calvert's shitty band sooner (not that it wasn't justified).   ;)  
You know what? You're completely right -- I am being hypocritical. Queue up the dead Heath Ledger jokes.

Re: Vinyl isn't dead yet...
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2008, 03:52:00 pm »
Better beside herself than beside Heath.
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by Julian, good manners AFICIONADO:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Charlie Nakatestes,Japanese Golfer:
  Vinyl isn't dead yet, but Heath Ledger is. Who would have guessed that?
Too soon, man, too soon. My sister is still beside herself. [/b]