Author Topic: Anyone see S&G?  (Read 13332 times)

Bags

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Anyone see S&G?
« on: December 15, 2003, 03:25:00 pm »
I'm going tonight, and wondering if the shows starts pretty promply at 8:00.

Bombay Chutney

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2003, 03:37:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Bagster:
  I'm going tonight, and wondering if the shows starts pretty promply at 8:00.
Last night started closer to 8:30.  I'd recommend getting there by 8:00, but there's no real need to rush to your seats.  Have fun!

Bags

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2003, 03:43:00 pm »
Excellent -- thanks, Skeeter.  We're meeting at RFD and I told folks we'd be there until 7:45, so we should be in good shape.
 
 Since you're answering, one more question -- were there folks looking for tickets outside last night?  I have a friend who wants to sell hers now...

Bombay Chutney

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2003, 04:18:00 pm »
I only saw the typical scalpers trying to buy tickets.  The guys that are always at big shows that offer to both sell and buy tickets.
 
 I saw a few people trying to sell extras though, so it might be a tough sell for your friend.

Bags

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2003, 03:09:00 pm »
Hey Skeeter, were the Everly Brothers at the Sunday show?
 
 So what did you think, overall?  There were moments that were just glorious, and there are some amazing songs, but as a whole, I wasn't blown away.  Doesn't change my Best of 2003 list....

Bombay Chutney

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2003, 03:25:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Bagster:
  Hey Skeeter, were the Everly Brothers at the Sunday show?
 
 So what did you think, overall?  There were moments that were just glorious, and there are some amazing songs, but as a whole, I wasn't blown away.  Doesn't change my Best of 2003 list....
Yeah - the Everly Brothers were there Sunday too.
 
 I thought it was a really good show. I was surprised they played so much that I didn't know, but what they played sounded really good.  I was surprised that it rocked as hard as it did. I'm not sure if I consider that a plus or a minus though.  I'd definitely put it in my Top 10 for 2003.  I wasn't exactly blown away, but I thought it was a great show and it was money well spent.
 
 That being said, I don't feel the need to ever see them again.  At least not in a venue that large and at prices that high.

Bags

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2003, 03:48:00 pm »
I agree...money well spent, and I'm glad I saw them.
 
 I enjoyed the Everly Brothers, but the third song was too much.
 
 Paul Simon is just amazing.  Old, but amazing.   ;)

jakez468

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2003, 05:31:00 pm »
my parents had a blast

ggw

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2003, 06:00:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by jakez468:
  my parents had a blast
How much did they pay the babysitter?

Bags

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2003, 06:53:00 pm »
washingtonpost.com
 Harmony of Discord
 Simon & Garfunkel, After All These Years
 
 By David Segal
 Washington Post Staff Writer
 Tuesday, December 16, 2003; Page C01
 
 
 It should come as no surprise that the most famous and fractious duo in folk-rock celebrate their anniversary on different dates. Art Garfunkel starts the clock 50 years ago, the day he met Paul Simon in a sixth-grade production of "Alice in Wonderland." Garfunkel played the Cheshire Cat, Simon the White Rabbit. It was the beginning of a friendship, Garfunkel told a reverent crowd at MCI Center Sunday night, "that I deeply cherish."
 
 When it was Simon's turn to reminisce, the cherishing was over. He wryly noted that Garfunkel's role in that version of "Alice" was a supporting one. ("An important supporting role, but . . . ") And though the two met at the age of 11, they started arguing at the age of 14, and, to Simon, that's the moment that matters.
 
 "This makes it the 47th anniversary of our first argument," he deadpanned.
 
 On their first tour in two decades, Simon and Garfunkel aren't merely reminding fans that together, in a collaboration that recorded for a mere six years, they produced dozens of transcendently beautiful songs, a canon of lyrical wit and sensuous melody that stands with the greats of the last half-century. For more than two jubilant and wistful hours on Sunday night, the duo also re-created a psychodrama. There was Garfunkel, heaving great bales of gratitude on Simon, deflecting whatever glory fell on his bushy head to the stoical man to his left. And there was Simon, impassive to the point of mummification, all but indifferent to the valentines of his former partner.
 
 We love Simon and Garfunkel, and we want them to love each other. We can't help it. We know that "The Boxer" isn't any more or less magnificent if the guy who wrote the words and the music dislikes the guy on high harmony, nor does it matter to "Bridge Over Troubled Water" that its creators didn't speak to each other for years. But we want them to get along anyway. What made this stop on the "Old Friends" tour such a triumph, of course, was the music -- a retrospective, sometimes acoustic, often with a band, that was sweet, unadulterated nostalgia. But it was riveting, also, to wait for and spot signs of warmth emanating from Simon. There weren't many.
 
 The show opened with a video montage that interspersed images of Simon and Garfunkel through the years with shots of then-current events, starting in the '50s and ending with the turn of the century and after. When the reel was finished, the lights went up and there they were, in the flesh, alone onstage, starting the night on a morose note, with "Old Friends."
 
 "Can you imagine us years from today, sharing a park bench quietly," they sang. "How terribly strange to be 70."
 
 Now that Simon and Garfunkel are both 62, the song is aging into a prophecy, which is why it seems far heavier and sadder now than it did when it was first released in 1968, on "Bookends." Time, it must be said, has been kinder to Simon and Garfunkel's music than to Simon and Garfunkel themselves, but it is hard to compete against something that doesn't seem to age. Even lines that are full of a mighty wind -- "Fools, said I, you do not know, silence like a cancer grows," for instance, from "The Sound of Silence" -- have lived past the folk-era boom of the '60s without embarrassment.
 
 Garfunkel's choirboy voice has lost some sheen and it now sounds slightly worn; he didn't attempt some of the highest notes, most notably on "Bridge Over Troubled Water." It took the two a while to settle into their harmonies, but by the fourth song, "America" they were nearing their heyday form.
 
 They make a strikingly odd couple. Garfunkel emotes through every note, living every chorus, his head tilted up, his hands sweeping around, enacting the drama of the music. When the pair sang "Like emptiness and harmony, I need someone to comfort me," during "Homeward Bound," he actually hugged himself.
 
 Simon, meanwhile, is utterly expressionless, a poker champ with a full house. Even when he struck a rock-star pose, while plucking the riff from "Mrs. Robinson," there was a Botoxed blankness to his stare. At first, it seemed like he was either nervous or unhappy, but eventually it began to seem like his style. One guy is a walking sunbeam, the other guy is an ice cube. Watching these two, you begin to wonder not what took them so long to reunite, but how they managed to stay together for as long as they did.
 
 Simon brightened a bit when it came time to introduce some guests: the Everly Brothers, who strode on to co-strum a few of their oldies, including "All I Have to Do Is Dream," "Wake Up, Little Susie" and "Let It Be Me." This was recompense of sorts: Simon and Garfunkel's first song, "Hey, Schoolgirl," recorded (under the name Tom and Jerry) when they were 16, was an imitation of the Everlys. The brothers, also famous for their feuds, looked perplexingly youthful, though the years have drained some of the power of their voices. The two were joined by Simon and Garfunkel for "Bye Bye Love," and then waved their way offstage.
 
 On and off through the night, Simon and Garfunkel were joined by a band that helped the pair bulk up their classics. A theremin solo was added to "The Boxer"; later in the night the multi-instrumentalist Mark Stewart blew into a what looked like cardboard mail tubes to add some bass notes to "The 59th Street Bridge Song"; a bongo solo was thrown into "My Little Town." In all, it was a tasteful touch-up that didn't overreach for hipness.
 
 A couple of Simon's solo songs were Garfunkeled, most effectively "American Tune," a song Garfunkel said is one of the many he wished the two had recorded before their split. But most of the night was given over to a carefully collected list of the songs that made Simon and Garfunkel famous in the '60s and early '70s, like "Cecilia," "Scarborough Fair," "America" and "At the Zoo."
 
 Garfunkel did a bit more talking than Simon, introducing "Kathy's Song" by identifying the song's inspiration, a young lady who collected change for the duo in a sailor's hat when they were busking in Europe. But Simon's introduction to "The Only Living Boy in New York" was the most touching moment of the show.
 
 The song was written, he explained, in 1969, when Garfunkel left for Mexico to begin filming "Catch-22." Left alone, Simon wrote a song about trying to cope with life after a buddy catches a plane to Mexico. To realize that this song was about Garfunkel was to appreciate that Simon, at some moment, actually liked the man who now bestows upon him so much worshipful affection.
 
 Things were chummiest near the end of the evening, when the two took a series of arm-in-arm bows during three encores. Even then, Simon seemed a little standoffish, and there was a pre-staged feel about the way they ended up with their hands held aloft at the end of the concert. It looked a bit like a pair of diplomats celebrating a cease-fire. But, and this will more than suffice, the rest of the evening sounded like the work of old friends.

Bags

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2003, 06:57:00 pm »
And for fun, the New York Times review:
 
 December 3, 2003, Wednesday
 
 METROPOLITAN DESK
 POP REVIEW; Simon and Garfunkel, Together Again, but Worn by Time
 By JON PARELES
 
 In 1968, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel sang about two old friends at 70 ''sharing a park bench silently.'' Simon and Garfunkel, now both 62, opened a sold-out three-night stand at Madison Square Garden last night, singing ''Old Friends.'' They are on a reunion tour -- doing their first shows together since 1993 -- that's likely to sell more than $50 million worth of tickets.
 
 That's not bad for an act that hasn't bothered with new material in a generation. The best they could do was have Mr. Garfunkel join in on songs from Mr. Simon's solo career since they broke up in in the mid-1970's.
 
 
 The songs Mr. Simon wrote for Simon and Garfunkel in his 20's were acutely conscious of time passing. Songs like ''Hazy Shade of Winter,'' ''Leaves That Are Green'' and ''Old Friends,'' and one the duo performed from Mr. Simon's solo career, ''Slip Slidin' Away,'' see the present disappearing into a past that can never be recaptured. ''Preserve your memories,'' the duo sang, ''they're all that's left you.'' It was a theme the concert embodied far too well.
 
 In the 1960's, Simon and Garfunkel offered thoughtful, lapidary music that recognized turbulent times in songs like ''The Sound of Silence.'' But Simon and Garfunkel were at their least graceful making grand statements, and they increasingly turned inward, following Mr. Simon's more whimsical lyrics and expanding musical vocabulary.
 
 They were comforting without seeming escapist; Mr. Simon's lyrics were too smart, his music too intricate.
 
 What Simon and Garfunkel are selling now, at up to $250 a ticket, isn't harmony. Mr. Simon, both songwriter and guitarist, and Mr. Garfunkel, whose job was to add airy upper harmonies and sing an occasional Simon song by himself, have been famously estranged through the years.
 
 On stage, Mr. Simon said they started singing together at 13 and started arguing at 14. And since they first broke up in the 1970's, they have found it increasingly difficult to recreate the precise vocal blend preserved on Simon and Garfunkel albums. A live album, like the one they made from a 1981 reunion, would need a lot of doctoring.
 
 Mr. Garfunkel briefly put an arm around Mr. Simon as they began ''Old Friends,'' and while he made a point of calling Mr. Simon's songwriting a gift, he still seems to have trouble believing he's the second banana. When he had a foreground part in a song, he sustained it to the point of dragging the tempo; ''I Am a Rock'' and ''The Boxer'' were nearly transformed from folk-rockers to dirges. When Mr. Garfunkel had a high note in the background, he often pushed it, perhaps because he now has to strain to reach it.
 
 Mr. Simon's voice has, like his songwriting, grown more supple and conversational through the years. But Mr. Garfunkel's voice has frayed; it buzzes like a drafty old house. When the duo traded verses on formerly solo Simon songs like ''El Condor Pasa,'' ''American Tune,'' and on Mr. Garfunkel's old showpiece, ''Bridge Over Troubled Water,'' the contrasts were glaring.
 
 Although nostalgia was thick in the arena from an audience filled with baby boomers, Simon and Garfunkel didn't try to replicate their younger selves. Sometimes, as in ''Scarborough Fair,'' they simplified the music, using a cello to replace what had been vocal counterpoint; sometimes Mr. Simon sang improvisational variants of his old melodies.
 
 ''The Sound of Silence,'' which was released during the 1960's in an acoustic guitar version but became a hit after as a folk-rock remake, segued between both versions. The band also added touches of Mr. Simon's more recent delvings into world music. ''The 59th Street Bridge Song'' included a slide version of a didgeridoo, an Australian wooden trumpet.
 
 Singing the old songs together, Simon and Garfunkel don't follow some of the rudiments of vocal harmony groups, like breathing in the same place or watching each others' faces.
 
 It's something that might not have occurred to a spectator if Simon and Garfunkel weren't touring with the duo they learned their harmonies from, the Everly Brothers.
 
 Don Everly, 66, and Phil Everly, 64, haven't always gotten along, either. But when, in mid-concert, they sang their hits like ''Wake Up Little Susie'' and ''All I Have to Do Is Dream,'' their brotherly unanimity was virtually untouched by time.

heilung4eva

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2022, 11:36:54 am »
I forgot that I went to this show. We had to euthanize our cat on the way (bad timing), so yeah.

Space Freely

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2022, 12:26:44 pm »
Thanks for dredging this thread up.

I never realized Bombay Chutney's real name was "Skeeter."

You learn some new board trivia every day.

Belated condolences regarding your cat.

Starsky

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2022, 12:46:20 pm »
I have only seen Paul Simon…many times…love him


I don’t get S&G. Like I don’t get what Art brings…I mean I like their records but Paul Simon writes all the songs. Ok Art delivered on Bridge Over Troubled Waters but it would still be a great song if Paul sang it.

Cock Van Der Palm

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Re: Anyone see S&G?
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2022, 01:03:08 pm »
Saw Paul Simon at the club.  Great show.  What a band!