Author Topic: Warehouse Next Door  (Read 80589 times)

Vas Deferens

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #210 on: July 12, 2006, 01:08:00 pm »
Snailhook, can you book XIU XIU, please?
 
   :)
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Lamb007

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #211 on: July 12, 2006, 01:15:00 pm »
Easily the most underappreciated singer recording today. I've been a huge Carla Bozulich fan since Ethyl Meatplow and I still think her albums with Geraldine Fibbers are classics. Even if you don't love her sound of the moment (she alternates between alt country, punk, and noise rock), you can't help but be seduced by her smokey vocals. Absolutely worth $8 and dragging your carcass off the couch. It'll be even better than "Rock Star: Supernova" I swear.
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by snailhook:
  TONIGHT!
 
 Clavius Productions presents:
 
 Wednesday, July 12
 Warehouse Next Door
 1017 7th St NW WDC
 $8, all ages
 doors at 8:30, show at 9:15
 
 Carla Bozulich's Evangelista (Constellation)
 Brandon Butler (ex-Canyon)
 Dead Science (Absolutely Kosher)
 with a short set by Carla's violist Anni Rossi
 
 
 Carla Bozulich describes her latest record, Evangelista, as "a sound that you can open your chest with, pull out what’s inside and make it change shapes." Frankly, I think it sounds like the former Ethyl Meatplow and Geraldine Fibbers frontwoman is asking her audience to rip their hearts out of their chests, stick microphones into their still-beating ventricles, and use the damn things as drum machines. It would certainly provide an appropriately minimalist backing beat to the sparse atmospherics Bozulich and her new Constellation Records cohorts serve up on the record’s nine tracks. Yet, as Bozulich explains, "Even inside this void there is sound. You will hear it...the sound of your own pulsing blood." Pray the only human heart on display is the one Bozulich always wears on her sleeve when Carla Bozulich’s Evangelista performs with Brandon Butler, Dead Science, and Anni Rossi at 8:30 p.m. at the Warehouse Next Door, 1017 7th St. NW. $8. (202) 783-3933. (Matthew Borlik)
 
 
 Carla Bozulich's Evangelista (playing in a full band with members of GYBE and A Silver Mt Zion)
   http://www.carlabozulich.com/Evangelistamenu.html  
 
 Carla Bozulich needs no introduction. Her work with Ethyl Meatplow, The Geraldine Fibbers, Scarnella, The Red-Headed Stranger (with Willie Nelson), and many others spans over twenty years of uncompromising sound, driven by a voice and
 vision that consistently delivers spine-tingling beauty, originality, and directness. You may have seen her on tour with WILCO or heard about her most recent work with members of Godspeed You Black Emperor and A Silver Mt Zion. Carla's new
 album (her first on Constellation, and the label's first release by a non-regional artist) is a devastating, elegiac, brutally honest song cycle that finds her voice unleashed with
 unprecedented emotive depth and determination. Evangelista is heartrending and gutwrenching, with isolation and desperation redeemed by incantatory sonics and out-reaching, soul-saving
 words. One damn compelling exorcism of a record, churning and channeling out of loneliness to heal and rebuild connective tissue through sound -- pocketful of beautiful noises and loops with various guest players adding strings, guitars, drums, organ, piano, hums, and other sounds. Constellation Records.
 
 
 Brando Butler
  http://www.brandonbutler.net/
 
 "The name Brandon Butler may not be familiar, but any fan of indie-rock and emo probably is aware of Butler's previous projects. He fronted one
 of the most overlooked emo bands of the mid- to late-'90s, Boys Life, which produced two of the finest albums in the vein of Christie Front Drive and Mineral. One album with his next project, Farewell Bend, showed a more hooky indie-rock style with those same emo leanings. Then Butler disappeared for a while, re-emerging with his project Canyon, on which his unique vocal styles took a more country- and folk-based rock sound. Now Butler, on his own, shows a mature, strong songwriter with an extremely unique voice. Butler has a raw, whiskey-soaked voice an octave or so higher than one might expect, and while it may have sounded out of place to some in his earlier rock offerings, it fits here nicely. He has a country-esque twang that doesn't sound at all
 forced, and the soft acoustic tracks speak of a harsh Midwestern life. For singer/songwriter fare, it definitely leans toward the country side
 of things, but the songs here evoke the rich songwriting style of Neil Young more than Willie Nelson, and Butler pulls it off as if he's lived
 a hundred years, his raw voice and stark style proving it."
 
 
 Dead Science
  http://www.thedeadscience.com/  
 
 With roots in jazz, art/experimental, and the more accessible side of post-rock, the band creates an enigmatic yet uniquely compelling sound which showcases vocalist SAM MICKEN's
 breathtaking tenor over the group's gritty
 guitar-drums-upright bass arrangements. Like experimental pop running mates Blonde Redhead, Deerhoof, and Xiu Xiu.
 Absolutely Kosher Records.
 
 
 Anni Rossi
   http://www.myspace.com/annirossi  
 
 A girl who writes songs on the viola (with vocals ala Joanna Newsom, Regina Spektor). It's slightly out of tune, but not too much, just enough to be rough.

Vas Deferens

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #212 on: July 12, 2006, 01:20:00 pm »
She's smoking on the devil's johnson   :p  
 
   
Quote
Originally posted by Lamb007:
  Easily the most underappreciated singer recording today. I've been a huge Carla Bozulich fan since Ethyl Meatplow..
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snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #213 on: July 12, 2006, 04:41:00 pm »
Quote
Snailhook, can you book XIU XIU, please?
i was going to book them in october at the rock and roll hotel, but they decided to reroute the tour. i think they are planning on hitting dc next spring. i booked them last august and they sold out the warehouse.

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #214 on: July 14, 2006, 12:47:00 pm »
Clavius Productions presents a rare area performance by Spain's premier conceptual sound artist Francisco Lopez, supported by DC's Violet!
 
 Saturday, July 15
 Warehouse Black Box Theatre
 1019 7th Street NW WDC
 $10, all ages
 doors at 9:30, show at 11 sharp!
 
 
 Francisco Lopez
 http://www.franciscolopez.net/
 
 Francisco L√≥pez is internationally recognized as one of the major figures of the underground experimental music scene. Over the last twenty five years he has developed an astonishing sonic universe, absolutely personal and iconoclastic, based on a profound listening of the world. Destroying boundaries between industrial sounds and wilderness sound environments, shifting with passion from the limits of perception to the most dreadful abyss of sonic power, proposing a blind, profound and transcendental listening, freed from the imperatives of knowledge and open to sensory and spiritual expansion. He has realized hundreds of concerts, projects with field recordings, and sound installations in 50 countries of the five continents. His extended catalog of sound pieces (with live and studio collaborations with over 100 international artists) has been released by more than 140 record labels worldwide, and he has been awarded twice with honorary mentions at the competition of Ars Electronica Festival. The audience will be blinded during the performance.
 
 
 Violet
 http://www.zeromoon.com/violet/index.html
 
 J. Surak (aka Violet) is a veteran experimenter from Washington, DC. Since the early 1980s, he has explored the netherworld between improvisation and composition to create something between the two auditory realms of experimental music. Found objects, microcassettes, damaged cds, prepared acoustic instruments, and old record players outfitted with foil are the tools of choice.

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #215 on: July 14, 2006, 02:26:00 pm »
Clavius Productions presents:
 
 Sunday, July 16
 Warehouse Next Door
 1017 7th St NW WDC
 $10, all ages
 doors at 8:30, show at 9:30
 
 Vetiver (from San Francisco, DiChristina)
 Benjy Ferree (from DC, now on Domino...congrats Benjy!)
 Blood Feathers (from Philly, Box Theory)
 plus two very special guest DJs!
 
 
 Vetiver
 http://www.vetiverse.com/
 
 To Find Me Gone is the second album from Vetiver, singer/songwriter Andy Cabic's ever-evolving musical home base. To Find Me Gone comes two years after Vetiver's eponymous debut and is being released May 23 by DiCristina Stairbuilders. Since Vetiver's release, Andy has toured the world repeatedly as a member of close crony Devendra Banhart's live band ("Hairy Fairy" and "Queens of Sheba" are among the monikers they're known by), as well as with Vetiver (occasionally with Banhart in tow); Vetiver released Between, an EP of live and demo recordings in conjunction with their 2005 European tour. Over the passed two years, Cabic's Vetiver has transmuted into a full-on singer/songwriter cum band/project aided and abetted by some of the best players (and Andy's closest friends) in the extended family of acoustic/experimentalists he finds himself a central member of. To Find Me Gone was skillfully produced by The Pernice Brothers' Thom Monahan at his home studio in Los Angeles during the Spring of '06; Thom also mixed the album with Andy. Most basic tracks were recorded by Cabic with guitarist Kevin Barker (Currituck County) and percussionist Otto Hauser (Espers) who he then toured with extensively backing Banhart, road-testing and adjusting some of this repertoire during those shows. Finishing touches were added and additional songs recorded throughout the year by an intriguing cast of characters including Devendra, Noah Georgeson (producer of Joanna Newsom and another "Hairy Fairy"), Vetiver's resident cellist Alissa Anderson, Monahan, Brad Laner, "Farmer" Dave Scher, Dina Maccabee, Irene Sazer, Shaw Pong Liu, and Jessica Ivry among others.
 
 Andy Cabic grew up in northern Virginia and spent a few years in Greensboro, North Carolina, playing guitar, writing music and recording as a member of the Raymond Brake. After moving to San Francisco, Cabic joined the rock band Tussle, simultaneously recruiting other local musicians including cellist Alissa Anderson, troubadour Devendra Banhart, along with special guests Colm O'Ciosoig (My Bloody Valentine), Hope Sandoval (Mazzy Star) and the then-unknown Joanna Newsom among others to record Vetiver. The album was released in 2004 to high critical praise from around the world:
 
 Vetiver is named for an aromatic East Indian grass that grows in California, and their music delivers on the sunny, hazy sweetness the band's name suggests. Singer Andy Cabic has -- with some help from Devendra Banhart -- written a set of songs that at their best are strange, subdued and otherworldly, a quality you can't fake...Cabic's voice lures you in, like a less showy Jeff Buckley, and the rest of the songs unfold like a dream. There's the rapturous "Without a Song" (with a tapping-break in the middle that's unlike anything I've heard), the jaunty "Farther On," and the complex epics that make up the album's last half, with a detour for the goofy "Amour Fou" (co-written with Banhart). This is folk music that combines the ghostly power of scratchy blues 78s with the epic swirl of My Bloody Valentine or Mazzy Star (members of which make guest appearances). (Phillip Cristman/Paste)
 
 The track at the heart of Vetiver is "Angel's Share," named after the whisky that evaporates during the distillation process. It fits a collection which suggests a world where the very atmosphere has become slightly tipsy, at the point between feeling warm and safe and a sense of menace. Devendra Banahrt (yes, him again) and Andy Cabic have taken their acoustic prairie sounds, added strings and called in some favours...the music is toned down because it's confident enough in its own texture to allow the beating of blood in your ears to provide the percussion. If Americana has always left you cold, a sip of this could be enough for you to fall under its influence. (Simon Hayes Budgen/NME)
 
 The languid sounds comes courtesy of Andy Cabic's quiet, sweetly dazed vocals and guitarist Devendra Banhart's delicate, rustic strumming. Vetiver has some overlap with Banhart's solo albums in that if you played it for a time traveler from 1911, they wouldn't freak out too badly, and it possesses a warmth that can't be faked. This should prove to be near ideal listening for the summer; great to lay back and drift off to when you're feeling heavy of limb and light of mind after a day out in the sun. (Tom Forget/Bust)
 
 Do not, repeat DO NOT, miss Vetiver, the Bay Area not-folk-but-not-rock outfit whose vocals-guitar-cello-violin live lineup brings an extraordinary air of grace and sway to leader Andy Cabic's strangely ageless, moonlit songs, the kind that Neil Young still writes sometimes. (Jay Babcock, LA Weekly)
 
 Like an album of dreamy, gentle songs that George Harrison would have written in some sunny country garden. There's hypnotic finger-picking on guitar, a warm steady drone of cello. The band includes neo-folkie mystic Devendra Banhart, who does minimal singing and songwriting for the most part, but one can hear the aesthetic of Banhart's music here, even if the songs aren't as haunting. The high point is probably "Angel's Share," a lovely song that has Hope Sandoval from the band Mazy Star singing languid and sweet harmony vocals. There's also a winning and odd swooning eulogy to the Seattle Arboretum. Vetiver is a type of Indian grass, and this is music designed for lazing about in a summer lawn. (John Adamian/Hartford Advocate)

 
 In the years following Vetiver's release Andy toured the world intensively with both Vetiver and in various incarnations of Devendra's touring ensemble. In early 2005 he joined Banhart in Woodstock to record the latter's fourth album Cripple Crow and then hit the road again, pausing only in May to do primary tracking for To Find Me Gone and then rejoin Devendra on the road. Final overdubbing and mixing on the album were completd in September and the final results are decisively different from its predecessor.
 
 While as carefully crafted as Vetiver, To Find Me Gone is far freer and more mature, reflecting Andy's progress as a songwriter, not to mention the musicianly growth experienced by all his friends who've lent their support to it. According to Andy, "I feel the new album embodies the swirling duality of these last two years, the duality of presence and absence, both in how protracted its birth has been, and in it's lyrical themes. There are scenes in the songs where figures come back from far away, to changes and time itself rolling by in their absence. To Find Me Gone has songs of remembrance and recollection, all made in order to conquer absence." Turning to the music per se there's a dreamy Topanga Canyon vibe on some songs (underlined by the pedal steel calling in the case of "No One Word"), and plenty of crunchy candy for those who have appreciated Andy's recent nods towards the magic era of '70s Fleetwood Mac (check out the screaming guitar outro on "Red Lantern Girls"). Yet everything is simply, amazingly Vetiver-esque, not anything else, as Andy Cabic steps out and makes To Find Me Gone his own original statement, an album that many will consider as one of the finest albums of 2006.
 
 
 Benjy Ferree
 http://www.benjyferree.com/
 
 Benjy Ferree may hail from our nation‚??s capital, but his real inspiration seems to come from across the Atlantic. His debut EP Leaving the Nest suggests nothing so much as an American take on the upbeat acoustic pop concocted by Paul McCartney and Ray Davies. While there are certainly elements of Americana in Ferree‚??s sound -- plaintive fiddles, out-of-tune harmonicas, and a Johnny Cash cover ("A Little at a Time") -‚?? his sing-song melodies clearly owe much to his British forbears. Hints of Davies and early Marc Bolan also shine through in his vocal delivery, while the plentiful backing harmonies that populate the album have Beatles written all over them.
 
 Luckily, Ferree is a strong enough performer to keep Leaving the Nest from feeling like mere homage. Despite being only 26 minutes long, the album makes an uncommonly strong impression. Ferree has a clear gift for fashioning hooky melodies, and each track contains a surplus. The musical ground covered here is considerable as well: not content to settle with one memorable motif, Ferree delivers up several at a time by dividing his songs up into clearly distinct but coherent sections, consistently throwing out enough melodic ideas to keep things interesting. The title track, for one, shifts between a George Harrison-inspired slide guitar lead, a bluesy droning verse, and a sing-along chorus: the elements seem irreconcilably different, but somehow Ferree manages to stitch them all together.
 
 Leaving the Nest is most impressive due to its density: Ferree crams into 26 minutes a wealth of melodies and hooks to make most full-length LPs look dull in comparison. It‚??s idyllic and upbeat without being sappy (complete with two whistling solos), comfortably familiar and yet well-executed enough to merit a listen even from the most jaded pair of ears. Benjy Ferree may not have a particularly unique or innovative sound, but he‚??s clearly hit on a winning formula. (Michael Cramer, Dusted)
 
 
 Blood Feathers
 http://www.bloodfeathers.com/
 http://www.myspace.com/bloodfeathersrockandrollband
 
 Named for the new or developing feathers which still contain blood in the quill, Blood Feathers have taken flight with their debut album Curse and Praise (Box Theory Records). Perhaps it‚??s the result of selective breeding? Featuring Mazarin front man Quentin Stoltzfus on drums and Mickey Walker on bass, Blood Feathers also includes Ben Dickey on guitar and Drew Mills (Aspera). Mills‚?? reedy voice at times brings to mind Tom Petty (Meddlin‚??), at others Geddy Lee (Cat Can Coo Too), and still others Colin Meloy (Sea Legs). It‚??s pretty sumptuous stuff -- perfect for a Sunday afternoon drive.

nkotb

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #216 on: July 31, 2006, 11:15:00 am »
Any details on the Oneida show yet?  Do you think it'll sell out?

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #217 on: August 01, 2006, 01:00:00 am »
i doubt this show will sell out, but there is a chance.  my guess is around 100 will show up.  if you can get there at 8:30, you'll be ok. you wanna see awesome color, anyway.
 
 $8, doors at 8:30
 
 awesome color: 9:30
 oneida: 10:30
 the apes: 11:30
 
 the apes are supposed to headline, but they might switch the order. don't miss anything!

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #218 on: August 01, 2006, 03:22:00 pm »
phil manley of trans am is onedia's new member and will be in the house tonight.

Vas Deferens

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #219 on: August 01, 2006, 03:28:00 pm »
can you tell me if Oneida is playing last?? I want to see them after Sleater-Kinney...
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snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #220 on: August 01, 2006, 03:34:00 pm »
oneida is scheduled to play in the middle, at 10:30.    they might switch with the apes, but chances are it won't happen.

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #221 on: August 01, 2006, 04:03:00 pm »
oneida called and they wanna play last now, so it looks like 11:30 for them.

Vas Deferens

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #222 on: August 01, 2006, 04:11:00 pm »
nice!  :)  though I think I'll miss some of it. SK will end playing at 11:30  I bet.
 
 
Quote
Originally posted by snailhook:
  oneida called and they wanna play last now, so it looks like 11:30 for them.
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amnesiac

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #223 on: August 21, 2006, 10:52:00 am »
Snailhook, any idea what the set times are for the Beirut show?

snailhook

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Re: Warehouse Next Door
« Reply #224 on: August 21, 2006, 11:10:00 am »
doors: 8:30
 
 get him eat him: 9:15
 
 the curtains: 10:15
 
 beirut: 11:15