Author Topic: Musicological banter  (Read 590100 times)

Starsky

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2805 on: April 08, 2022, 08:34:01 am »
I just can’t get it up for combat….

The Clash ended with Sandinista

I mean if I hear should I stay or should I go or rock the casbah one more time I will blow my brains out

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2806 on: April 08, 2022, 08:48:50 am »
So I get that...and kinda feel the same way about those songs
...although I do love that 12inch instrumental of rock the casbah

but there are some really great other tracks
Know your rights is one of my all-time favorite clash songs
Straight to hell is a straight-up classic, live versions of this are killer (and an excellent sample for M.I.A. - Paper Planes)
Car Jamming!  I love when he's screaming: "Hey fellas, Lauren bacall, In a car jam, Yeah I don't believe it"
and this great line too "And what is that,  funk multi-national Anthem rocking from a thousand King kong cassette decks"

and Red angel Dragnet...Boardie Kosmo sings vocal!
Getto Defendant with Allen Ginsberg is also one of my favs

and the last song is such a great way to end an album: death is a star
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slack

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2807 on: April 08, 2022, 08:54:41 am »
it was a very good year...50 years ago
Some of my all time favorite albums (lot of duds on here TBH)
slack

kosmo vinyl

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2808 on: April 08, 2022, 09:02:40 am »
I always come back to this, but the only Clash album they haven't done anything deluxe with is "Give 'Em Enough Rope" I personally think it's a great album but apparently the band weren't enthralled with the recording process and commercial sound for that one, so there is probably nothing extra floating around.  And I'm guessing all of the Sandinista! era recordings got put out as well..
T.Rex

Starsky

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2809 on: April 08, 2022, 09:05:52 am »
They have done a Sandinista deluxe?

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2810 on: April 08, 2022, 09:18:55 am »
They have done a Sandinista deluxe?
so instead of 3 slabs it's 12 ;)

this is a great quote

Despite the positive critical reception, Sandinista! was a flop compared to its Platinum-selling predecessor and spawned no hit singles. Wry in retrospect, Mick Jones claimed he “always saw it as a record for people who were on oil rigs or Arctic stations that weren’t able to get to the record shops regularly.” Not exactly a huge market.
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slack

Starsky

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2811 on: April 08, 2022, 09:23:30 am »
Good article

I just love all the dub influence and the album is chock full of classics


Just listen to the Sound of sinners

Off-season Santa

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2812 on: April 08, 2022, 12:20:45 pm »
Can I just say that it's killing me that the Mountain Goats are finally playing in Tallahassee?


(I mean, they've played there before, but, man!)

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2813 on: May 16, 2022, 04:51:31 pm »
https://americansongwriter.com/pink-floyds-david-gilmour-on-the-band-touring-again-i-suppose-its-a-possibility/

David Gilmour has hinted maybe—just maybe—the band will get back together to tour. At least, he hasn’t taken it completely off the table.

“We haven’t even thought about doing live shows, but I suppose it’s a possibility,” said Gilmour in a recent interview. “I haven’t done one in such a long time, but who knows – I don’t know.”
slack

Starsky

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2814 on: May 16, 2022, 08:27:08 pm »
I know… it’s kind of unbelievable as I really think he retired with the full intention of staying retired

Didn’t he make an appearance at a Lucius show last week?

I get the sense he is bored…

A Pink Floyd tour after nearly 30 years seems utterly pointless but a solo tour could be possible

kosmo vinyl

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2815 on: May 16, 2022, 09:16:11 pm »
While reading a review of Lust For Life, I was wondering what became of the Sales brothers since they were involved in Tin Machine.. still really like that one and it holds up really well IMHO

Anyways Wikipedia is a little vague as to what the brothers have done of late, but this bit about Tony Sales the bassist was wow

He and his brother, Hunt, did some recordings together which were stored away after Tony had a car accident in 1979 so severe that he was all but dead for several minutes before being revived. He was consequently in a coma for over eight months but eventually recovered from his injuries and went back into music.
T.Rex

Walk,on,by

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2816 on: May 17, 2022, 01:49:15 pm »
EVERYTHING IS NOW OK, IN THE WORLD OF HERO WORHSIPPING A SINGLE BAND.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxyvPR1s5vw

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2817 on: May 17, 2022, 02:03:20 pm »
that does look good.  Their last show at the 9:30 was top notch IMO
slack

Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2818 on: May 31, 2022, 08:20:13 am »
Neat story I'd never heard

“Hello darkness, my old friend…” Everybody knows the iconic Simon & Garfunkel song, but do you know the amazing story behind the first line of The Sounds of Silence?
It began 62 years ago, when Arthur “Art” Garfunkel, a Jewish kid from Queens, enrolled in Columbia University. During freshman orientation, Art met a student from Buffalo named Sandy Greenberg, and they immediately bonded over their shared passion for literature and music. Art and Sandy became roommates and best friends. With the idealism of youth, they promised to be there for each other no matter what.
Soon after starting college, Sandy was struck by tragedy. His vision became blurry and although doctors diagnosed it as temporary conjunctivitis, the problem grew worse. Finally after seeing a specialist, Sandy received the devastating news that severe glaucoma was destroying his optic nerves. The young man with such a bright future would soon be completely blind.
Sandy was devastated and fell into a deep depression. He gave up his dream of becoming a lawyer and moved back to Buffalo, where he worried about being a burden to his financially-struggling family. Consumed with shame and fear, Sandy cut off contact with his old friends, refusing to answer letters or return phone calls.
Then suddenly, to Sandy’s shock, his buddy Art showed up at the front door. He was not going to allow his best friend to give up on life, so he bought a ticket and flew up to Buffalo unannounced. Art convinced Sandy to give college another go, and promised that he would be right by his side to make sure he didn’t fall - literally or figuratively.
Art kept his promise, faithfully escorting Sandy around campus and effectively serving as his eyes. It was important to Art that even though Sandy had been plunged into a world of darkness, he should never feel alone. Art actually started calling himself “Darkness” to demonstrate his empathy with his friend. He’d say things like, “Darkness is going to read to you now.” Art organized his life around helping Sandy.
One day, Art was guiding Sandy through crowded Grand Central Station when he suddenly said he had to go and left his friend alone and petrified. Sandy stumbled, bumped into people, and fell, cutting a gash in his shin. After a couple of hellish hours, Sandy finally got on the right subway train. After exiting the  station at 116th street, Sandy bumped into someone who quickly apologized - and Sandy immediately recognized Art’s voice! Turned out his trusty friend had followed him the whole way home, making sure he was safe and giving him the priceless gift of independence. Sandy later said, “That moment was the spark that caused me to live a completely different life, without fear, without doubt. For that I am tremendously grateful to my friend.”
Sandy graduated from Columbia and then earned graduate degrees at Harvard and Oxford. He married his high school sweetheart and became an extremely successful entrepreneur and philanthropist.
While at Oxford, Sandy got a call from Art. This time Art was the one who needed help. He’d formed a folk rock duo with his high school pal Paul Simon, and they desperately needed $400 to record their first album. Sandy and his wife Sue had literally $404 in their bank account, but without hesitation Sandy gave his old friend what he needed.
Art and Paul's first album was not a success, but one of the songs, The Sounds of Silence, became a #1 hit a year later. The opening line echoed the way Sandy always greeted Art. Simon & Garfunkel went on to become one of the most beloved musical acts in history.
The two Columbia graduates, each of whom has added so much to the world in his own way, are still best friends. Art Garfunkel said that when he became friends with Sandy, “my real life emerged. I became a better guy in my own eyes, and began to see who I was - somebody who gives to a friend.” Sandy describes himself as “the luckiest man in the world.”
Adapted from Sandy Greenberg’s memoir: “Hello Darkness, My Old Friend: How Daring Dreams and Unyielding Friendship Turned One Man’s Blindness into an Extraordinary Vision for Life."
slack

Cock Van Der Palm

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Re: Musicological banter
« Reply #2819 on: May 31, 2022, 09:06:57 am »
 Nice story