Author Topic: O'Mankie's car wash service?  (Read 3584 times)


Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2007, 05:03:00 pm »
The saying, "more money than sense" comes to mind

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2007, 06:11:00 pm »

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2007, 03:41:00 pm »

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2007, 04:26:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Dupek Chakra:
  Good News for O'mankie
What's so good about that?? The twat is recovering....

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2007, 10:15:00 am »
Quote
Originally posted by Roadbike Mankie:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Dupek Chakra:
  Good News for O'mankie
What's so good about that?? The twat is recovering.... [/b]
If he took you hostage would you apologize on TV?

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2007, 10:25:00 am »
Quote
Originally posted by Dupek Chakra:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Roadbike Mankie:
   
Quote
Originally posted by Dupek Chakra:
  Good News for O'mankie
What's so good about that?? The twat is recovering.... [/b]
If he took you hostage would you apologize on TV? [/b]
Argentina tried to take us Brits hostage back in 82...they failed....miserably. Do you really think they'd try that one again?
 
 However, if some camel jockey had me on TV with a gun to my head and knife to my comrades throats off camera.......I might!

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2007, 10:30:00 am »
American sailors wouldn't have let themselves be captured by the Iranians.  We would have openend fire even if the odd were no-win.
 
 You pussweeds...

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2007, 10:45:00 am »
Quote
Originally posted by Dupek Chakra:
  American sailors wouldn't have let themselves be captured by the Iranians.  We would have openend fire even if the odd were no-win.
 
 You pussweeds...
That's the problem with yanks...shoot first, think later. Now Britain has a viable excuse to turn Tehran into a parking lot.
 
 Actually, American sailors would probably have shot the the Brits or Canadians instead of the Iranians in yet another case of friendly fire....when you're as trigger happy as the yanks are, at least learn to shoot straight for fuck's sake!

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2007, 10:57:00 am »
What if a flesh eating zombie walked up to you.  Would you shoot it in the head instantly, or would you let it nibble on you a little bit  first before you shot it...just to show everyone you had good reasons to shoot?

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2007, 11:04:00 am »
Why would  you shoot a zombie? They're already dead.

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2007, 11:19:00 am »
I rest my case.

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2007, 02:59:00 pm »
HUH!

Venerable Bede

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2007, 03:17:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by Roadbike Mankie:
  Argentina tried to take us Brits hostage back in 82...they failed....miserably. Do you really think they'd try that one again?
 
looks like they are trying  something -
 
 Argentina presses Falklands claim By BILL CORMIER, Associated Press Writer
 Fri Mar 30, 3:17 AM ET
 
 BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Twenty-five years after hostilities ceased, Argentina is opening a new front in the Falklands War.
 
 Rather than jets and mortar rounds, however, this salvo involves diplomats appealing for help at the United Nations and the government reasserting long-standing claims to the island chain where far more sheep than people huddle against the forbidding South Atlantic winds.
 
 London, however, maintains its hold on the island, which Argentina invaded 25 years ago this Monday.
 
 Many Argentines ?? especially the left-wing power base of President Nestor Kirchner ?? see the war as a huge mistake pursued by the nation's discredited military dictators. But Argentines still universally call the Falklands ?? known in South America as the "Malvinas" ?? as their own. And in this election year, Kirchner appears poised to gain support by pushing hard against Britain's firm refusal to negotiate on the islands' fate.
 
 "Argentina has never consented to the United Kingdom's claim of rights to the territory," Eduardo Airaldi, Kirchner's top official in charge of the South Atlantic region, said as he described Kirchner's position in an interview with The Associated Press.
 
 Kirchner's predecessors didn't do as much to press Argentina's claims to the islands. Former President Carlos Menem restored diplomatic ties with Britain in 1990 after agreeing to shelve the sovereignty question.
 
 In contrast, Kirchner declared the archipelago's recovery to be "a permanent and irrevocable objective of the Argentine people." His government expressed irritation when Britain protested the presence of an Argentine ship near the islands and challenged changes to fishing rights made by Falklands administrators. In January he sent his foreign minister to lobby U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to support new sovereignty talks.
 
 Argentina on Tuesday said it scrapped a deal Menem had signed with the British to explore for oil and natural gas around the Falklands. The joint venture yielded no major discoveries, but was long on symbolism, since it represented an Argentine acknowledgment of British rights to the sea floor. Britain's Foreign Office called the end of the deal a "regrettable action" that "will not in any way help Argentina in its claim for sovereignty of the Islands."
 
 Just before the Argentine invasion on April 2, 1982, diplomats from both countries had been talking about an eventual Hong Kong-like handover of the colony Britain had occupied since 1833, despite the idea's unpopularity in London and among the 3,000 or so British-descended residents of the island, known as "kelpers."
 
 But the invasion changed all that.
 
 "We will not discuss sovereignty unless and until the Islanders so wish. At present they do not," a British Foreign Office spokeswoman told the AP on condition of anonymity in line with department policy. "In this respect, 1982 changed everything."
 
 Britain reacted quickly to the invasion, summoning the Queen Elizabeth 2 cruise ship to carry 3,000 troops and mobilizing an armada that included Prince Andrew to sail some 8,000 miles south.
 
 British artillery pounded the Argentine draftees who had dug foxholes in the rocky soil. Humbled by the onslaught, the South American nation surrendered that June 14, after 649 Argentine and 272 British troops were killed.
 
 The two countries share a long history ?? the British helped build Argentina's railroads and promoted its beef industry. A large British community still lives in Argentina, served by an English-language daily paper in the capital.
 
 But the Falklands dispute remains an open wound. Many public schools, streets, small businesses and taxi stands are proudly named for the Malvinas. Billboards that read "The Malvinas are ours" are a common sight.
 
 Kirchner has sought to avoid offending either the left or the right in Argentina by focusing on the idea that Britain acted illegally when it expelled an Argentine military garrison from the islands in 1833, a nationalist tone that analysts say won't hurt him this election year.
 
 So Argentines were outraged recently when British Prime Minister        Tony Blair compared the British retaking of the islands to the        Kosovo air war that led to the overthrow of Serbian strongman        Slobodan Milosevic.
 
 "I have got no doubt it was the right thing to do," Blair said in a podcast on his Web site. "But for reasons not simply to do with British sovereignty but also because I think there was a principle at stake which is that a land shouldn't be annexed in that way."
 
 Many Argentines initially supported the war as well, but came to blame the ruling military junta for picking a fight the country had little hope of winning, and sending conscripts to their deaths.
 
 The greatest legacy of the 74-day war for Argentines is that the defeat hastened the fall of the dictatorship a year later in 1983, said Riordan Roett, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins University.
 
 ___
 
 Associated Press Writers Oscar Serrat in Buenos Aires and Raphael G. Satter in London contributed to this report.
OU812

Frank Gallagher

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Re: O'Mankie's car wash service?
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2007, 03:27:00 pm »
So it was your sand pile...we kicked you off in 1833...you go home crying to mama. Then in 1982 you tried to kick us off but we gave you yet another good hiding so it's ours to keep....get over it. you lost TWICE
 
 I fully agree with the policy of "if the kelps want to be Argentinian, then we have something to talk about, but until then.....FUCK OFF