Author Topic: The Digital Music Thread  (Read 5843 times)

kosmo vinyl

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Re: The Digital Music Thread
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2008, 05:51:00 pm »
well i was going to make a bunch of snide remarks about the recent itunes/beatles deal, but it turns out that the initial reports were false...
T.Rex

vansmack

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Re: The Digital Music Thread
« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2008, 05:54:00 pm »
Quote
Originally posted by kosmo:
  well i was going to make a bunch of snide remarks about the recent itunes/beatles deal, but it turns out that the initial reports were false...
It was because of the American Idol night where they performed Lennon/McCartney songs and because of the Apple/AI deal, they were all made available on iTunes.  That's what all the deliberations were about - crappy cover versions!
27>34

kosmo vinyl

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Re: The Digital Music Thread
« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2008, 06:03:00 pm »
actually it was this report
 
 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/07/nmacca107.xml
 
 iTunes to strike deal over Beatles' hits
 
 By Sophie Borland
 Last Updated: 2:16am GMT 08/03/2008
 
 Sir Paul McCartney is expected to release the Beatles back catalogue for download on the internet in a deal which could be worth up to £300 million.
 
 blah blah blah
 
 guess the unnamed source close to macca didn't have the story correct..
 
 it would appear this story got legs due to paul's pending divorce settlement and possibly micheal jackson's own financial problems.
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kosmo vinyl

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Re: The Digital Music Thread
« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2008, 08:28:00 pm »
found another one of those upload and share music with your friends websites and i shit you not as this is what is posted about whether or not it's legal
 
 tunesbag.com
 Is tunesBag a legal service?
 
 Yes, tunesBag can only be used to manage music you already have. You can share your library with friends according to the law in Austria (Privatkopie).
 
 Austrian law
 § 42 UrhG. (1) Jedermann darf von einem Werk einzelne Vervielfältigungsstücke auf Papier oder einem ähnlichen Träger zum eigenen Gebrauch herstellen.
 (4) Jede natürliche Person darf von einem Werk einzelne Vervielfältigungsstücke auf anderen als den in Abs. 1 genannten Trägern zum privaten Gebrauch und weder für unmittelbare noch mittelbare kommerzielle Zwecke herstellen.
 (5) Eine Vervielfältigung zum eigenen oder privaten Gebrauch liegt vorbehaltlich der Abs. 6 und 7 nicht vor, wenn sie zu dem Zweck vorgenommen wird, das Werk mit Hilfe des Vervielfältigungsstückes der ?ffentlichkeit zugänglich zu machen. Zum eigenen oder privaten Gebrauch hergestellte Vervielfältigungsstücke dürfen nicht dazu verwendet werden, das Werk damit der ?ffentlichkeit zugänglich zu machen.
 Source: www.ris.bka.gv.at
 Further information: i4j.at
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ggw

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Re: The Digital Music Thread
« Reply #34 on: March 24, 2008, 05:21:00 pm »
Anyone see Billy Bragg's Op-Ed piece for the New York Times this weekend?
 
 Op-Ed Contributor
 The Royalty Scam
 By BILLY BRAGG
 Dorset, England
 
 LAST week at South by Southwest, the rock music conference held every year in Austin, Tex., the talk in hotel lobbies, coffeeshops and the convention center was dominated by one issue: how do musicians make a living in the age of the Internet? It??s a problem our industry has struggled with in the wake of the rising popularity of sharing mp3 music files.
 
 Our discussions were brought into sharp relief when news reached Austin of the sale of Bebo.com to AOL for a staggering $850 million. Bebo is a social-networking site whose membership has risen to 40 million in just two years. In Britain, it ranks with MySpace and Facebook in popularity, although its users tend to come from a younger age group.
 
 Estimates suggested that the founder, Michael Birch (along with his wife and co-founder, Xochi), walked away with $600 million for his 70 percent stake in the company.
 
 I heard the news with a particular piquancy, as Mr. Birch has cited me as an influence in Bebo??s attitude toward artists. He got in touch two years ago after I took MySpace to task over its proprietary rights clause. I was concerned that the site was harvesting residual rights from original songs posted there by unsigned musicians. As a result of my complaints, MySpace changed its terms and conditions to state clearly that all rights to material appearing on the site remain with the originator.
 
 A few weeks later, Mr. Birch came to see me at my home. He was hoping to expand his business by hosting music and wanted my advice on how to construct an artist-centered environment where musicians could post original songs without fear of losing control over their work. Following our talks, Mr. Birch told the press that he wanted Bebo to be a site that worked for artists and held their interests first and foremost.
 
 In our discussions, we largely ignored the elephant in the room: the issue of whether he ought to consider paying some kind of royalties to the artists. After all, wasn??t he using their music to draw members ?? and advertising ?? to his business? Social-networking sites like Bebo argue that they have no money to distribute ?? their value is their membership. Well, last week Michael Birch realized the value of his membership. I??m sure he??ll be rewarding those technicians and accountants who helped him achieve this success. Perhaps he should also consider the contribution of his artists.
 
 The musicians who posted their work on Bebo.com are no different from investors in a start-up enterprise. Their investment is the content provided for free while the site has no liquid assets. Now that the business has reaped huge benefits, surely they deserve a dividend.
 
 What??s at stake here is more than just the morality of the market. The huge social networking sites that seek to use music as free content are as much to blame for the malaise currently affecting the industry as the music lover who downloads songs for free. Both the corporations and the kids, it seems, want the use of our music without having to pay for it.
 
 The claim that sites such as MySpace and Bebo are doing us a favor by promoting our work is disingenuous. Radio stations also promote our work, but they pay us a royalty that recognizes our contribution to their business. Why should that not apply to the Internet, too?
 
 Technology is advancing far too quickly for the old safeguards of intellectual property rights to keep up, and while we wait for the technical fixes to emerge, those of us who want to explore the opportunities the Internet offers need to establish a set of ground rules that give us the power to decide how our music is exploited and by whom.
 
 We need to do this not for the established artists who already have lawyers, managers and careers, but for the fledgling songwriters and musicians posting original material onto the Web tonight. The first legal agreement that they enter into as artists will occur when they click to accept the terms and conditions of the site that will host their music. Worryingly, no one is looking out for them.
 
 If young musicians are to have a chance of enjoying a fruitful career, then we need to establish the principle of artists?? rights throughout the Internet ?? and we need to do it now.
 
 Billy Bragg is a songwriter and author.